Cover: Girolamo Frescobaldi, from Harvard University PressCover: Girolamo Frescobaldi in E-DITION

Girolamo Frescobaldi

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E-DITION

$65.00 • £54.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674332195

Publication Date: 01/01/1983

408 pages

illsutrations

World

Related Subjects

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  • Preface
  • Part One: Freschobaldi’s Life
    • 1. Ferrara
    • 2. Rome and Flanders, 1607–1608
    • 3. Rome, 1608–1614
    • 4. Mantua, 1614–1615
    • 5. Rome, 1615–1628
    • 6. Florence, 1628–1634
    • 7. Rome, 1634–1643
    • 8. Frescobaldi’s Instruments
  • Part Two: The Music
    • 9. The Art of Counterpoint: The Fantasie of 1608 and the Recercari et Canzoni of 1615
    • 10. Songlike Affetti and Diversity of Passi: The Toccate e Partite Libro Primo of 1614-1616
    • 11. Various Subjects and Airs: The Capricci of 1624
    • 12. A New Manner: The Secondo Libro di Toccate of 1627
    • 13. A Variety of Inventions: The Canzoni of 1628 and 1634
    • 14. Last Works: The Fiori Musicali of 1635 and the Aggiunta to Toccate I of 1637
    • 15. The Performance of Frescobaldi’s Keyboard Music
  • Appendix I: Other Keyboard Works Attributed to Frescobaldi
  • Appendix II: Vocal Works
  • Catalogue of Works
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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