HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Going to the People: Chinese Intellectuals and Folk Literature, 1918–1937, from Harvard University PressCover: Going to the People in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 121

Going to the People

Chinese Intellectuals and Folk Literature, 1918–1937

Currently unavailable

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$36.95 • £29.95 • €33.50

ISBN 9780674356269

Publication Date: 02/28/1986

Short

It is generally believed that Mao Zedong’s populism was an abrupt departure from traditional Chinese thought. This study demonstrates that many of its key concepts had been developed several decades earlier by young May Fourth intellectuals, including Liu Fu, Zhou Zuoren, and Gu Jiegang. The Chinese folk-literature movement, begun at National Beijing University in 1918, changed the attitudes of Chinese intellectuals toward literature and toward the common people.

Turning their backs on “high culture” and Confucianism, young folklorists began “going to the people,” particularly peasants, to gather the songs, legends, children’s stories, and proverbs that Chang-tai Hung here describes and analyzes. Their focus on rural culture, rural people, and rural problems was later to be expanded by the Chinese Communist revolutionaries.

From Our Blog

Jacket: How To Be Gay, by David M. Halperin, from Harvard University Press

Celebrating Pride Month, Part II

To celebrate Pride Month, we are highlighting excerpts from books that explore the lives and experiences of the LGBT+ community. This second excerpt comes from How To Be Gay, a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award, in which David M. Halperin, a pioneer of LGBTQ studies, dares to suggest that gayness is a way of being that gay men must learn from one another to become who they are.