Cover: Greek Religion, from Harvard University PressCover: Greek Religion in PAPERBACK

Greek Religion

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PAPERBACK

$38.00 • £30.95 • €34.00

ISBN 9780674362819

Publication Date: 03/15/1987

Short

512 pages

6 x 9 inches

North America only

  • Preface to the English Edition
  • Introduction
    • 1. A Survey of Scholarship
    • 2. The Sources
    • 3. The Scope of the Study
  • I. Prehistory and the Minoan–Mycenaean Age
    • 1. The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age
    • 2. Indo-European
    • 3. The Minoan–Mycenaean Religion
      • 3.1. A Historical Survey
      • 3.2. The State of the Sources
      • 3.3. The Cult Places
        • Caves
        • Peak Sanctuaries
        • Tree Sanctuaries
        • House Sanctuaries
        • Temples
        • Graves
      • 3.4. Rituals and Symbols
      • 3.5. The Minoan Deities
      • 3.6. The Mycenaean Gods and Linear B
    • 4. The ‘Dark Age’ and the Problem of Continuity
  • II. Ritual and Sanctuary
    • 1. ‘Working Sacred Things’: Animal Sacrifice
      • 1.1. Description and Interpretation
      • 1.2. Blood Rituals
      • 1.3. Fire Rituals
      • 1.4. Animal and God
    • 2. Gift Offerings and Libation
      • 2.1. First Fruit Offerings
      • 2.2. Votive Offerings
      • 2.3. Libation
    • 3. Prayer
    • 4. Purification
      • 4.1. Function and Methods
      • 4.2. The Sacred and the Pure
      • 4.3. Death, Illness, and Madness
      • 4.4. Purification by Blood
      • 4.5. Pharmakos
    • 5. The Sanctuary
      • 5.1. Temenos
      • 5.2. Altar
      • 5.3. Temple and Cult Image
      • 5.4. Anathemata
    • 6. Priests
    • 7. The Festival
      • 7.1. Pompe
      • 7.2. Agermos
      • 7.3. Dancing and Hymns
      • 7.4. Masks, Phalloi, Aischrologia
      • 7.5. Agon
      • 7.6. The Banquet of the Gods
      • 7.7. Sacred Marriage
    • 8. Ecstasy and Divination
      • 8.1 Enthousiasmos
      • 8.2 The Art of the Seer
      • 8.3 Oracles
  • III. The Gods
    • 1. The Spell of Homer
    • 2. Individual Gods
      • 2.1. Zeus
      • 2.2. Hera
      • 2.3. Poseidon
      • 2.4. Athena
      • 2.5. Apollo
      • 2.6. Artemis
      • 2.7. Aphrodite
      • 2.8. Hermes
      • 2.9. Demeter
      • 2.10. Dionysos
      • 2.11. Hephaistos
      • 2.12. Ares
    • 3. The Remainder of the Pantheon
      • 3.1. Lesser Gods
      • 3.2. Societies of Gods
      • 3.3. Nature Deities
      • 3.4. Foreign Gods
      • 3.5. Daimon
    • 4. The Special Character of Greek Anthropomorphism
  • IV. The Dead, Heroes, and Chthonic Gods
    • 1. Burial and the Cult of the Dead
    • 2. Afterlife Mythology
    • 3. Olympian and Chthonic
    • 4. The Heroes
    • 5. Figures Who Cross the Chthonic–Olympian Boundary
      • 5.1. Heracles
      • 5.2. The Dioskouroi
      • 5.3. Asklepios
  • V. Polis and Polytheism
    • 1. Thought Patterns in Greek Polytheism
      • 1.1. General Considerations
      • 1.2. The Family of the Gods
      • 1.3. Pairs of Gods
      • 1.4. Old and Young
      • 1.5. Dionysos
    • 2. The Rhythm of the Festivals
      • 2.1. Festival Calendars
      • 2.2. Year Ending and New Year
      • 2.3. Karneia
      • 2.4. Anthesteria
      • 2.5. Thesmophoria
    • 3. Social Functions of Cult
      • 3.1. Gods between Amorality and Law
      • 3.2. The Oath
      • 3.3. The Creation of Solidarity in the Playing and the Interplay of Roles
      • 3.4. Initiation
      • 3.5. Crisis Management
    • 4. Piety in the Mirror of Greek Language
      • 4.1. ‘Sacred’
      • 4.2. Theos
      • 4.3. Eusebeia
  • VI. Mysteries and Asceticism
    • 1. Mystery Sanctuaries
      • 1.1. General Considerations
      • 1.2. Clan and Family Mysteries
      • 1.3. The Kabeiroi and Samothrace
      • 1.4. Eleusis
    • 2. Bacchica and Orphica
      • 2.1. Bacchic Mysteries
      • 2.2. Bacchic Hopes for an Afterlife
      • 2.3. Orpheus and Pythagoras
    • 3. Bios
  • VII. Philosophical Religion
    • 1. The New Foundation: Being and the Divine
    • 2. The Crisis: Sophists and Atheists
    • 3. The Deliverance: Cosmic Religion and Metaphysics
      • 3.1. Pre-Socratic Outlines
      • 3.2. Plato: The Good and the Soul
      • 3.3. Plato: Cosmos and Visible Gods
      • 3.4. Aristotle and Xenocrates: Spirit, God, and Demons
    • 4. Philosophical Religion and Polis Religion: Plato’s Laws
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index of Greek Words
  • Index

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