Cover: Bonaparte: 1769–1802, from Harvard University PressCover: Bonaparte in HARDCOVER

Bonaparte

1769–1802

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$39.95 • £31.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674368354

Publication Date: 04/13/2015

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1024 pages

6-3/8 x 9-1/4 inches

22 color illustrations, 8 maps

Belknap Press

World

  • List of Maps*
  • Introduction
  • I. Napoleon and Corsica: 1769–1793
    • 1. An Italian Family in Corsica
    • 2. A French Upbringing
    • 3. The French Officer and the Corsican Patriot
    • 4. The Revolutionary of Ajaccio
    • 5. Lost Illusions
  • II. Entry on Stage: 1793–1796
    • 6. Toulon
    • 7. In Search of a Future
    • 8. Happiness
  • III. The Italian Campaign: 1796–1797
    • 9. That Beautiful Italy
    • 10. An Italian Policy?
    • 11. On the Road to Vienna
    • 12. Mombello
    • 13. Saving the Directory
    • 14. Campoformio
    • 15. Parisian Interlude
  • IV. The Egyptian Expedition: 1798–1799
    • 16. The Road to the Indies
    • 17. The Conquest of the Nile
    • 18. Governing Egypt
    • 19. Jaffa
    • 20. The Return from the Orient
  • V. Crossing the Rubicon: 1799
    • 21. The Conspiracy
    • 22. Brumaire
  • VI. A King for the Revolution: 1799–1802
    • 23. First Consul
    • 24. First Steps
    • 25. From the Tuileries to Marengo
    • 26. Works and Days
    • 27. The Turning Point of 1801
    • 28. Peace with the Church
    • 29. The Top of the Ladder
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Maps:
    • Corsica
    • The Siege of Toulon
    • Europe in 1789
    • Battlefields of Italy (1796–1797)
    • Italy in 1796
    • Italy after the Treaty of Campoformio (October 17, 1797)
    • Egyptian Campaign (1798–1799)
    • Campaign of 1800 in Italy

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