HARVARD STUDIES IN CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY
Cover: Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, Volume 91 in HARDCOVER

Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, Volume 91

Edited by R. J. Tarrant

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$61.50 • £49.95 • €55.50

ISBN 9780674379398

Publication Date: 06/21/1988

Short

This volume of twenty articles includes: T. Corey Brennan, “An Ethnic Joke in Homer?”; Gregory Crane, “The Laughter of Aphrodite in Theocritus, Idyll 1”; Andrew R. Dyck, “The Glossographoi”; R. L. Fowler, “The Rhetoric of Desperation”; Douglas E. Gerber, “Short-Vowel Subjunctives in Pindar”; Eric Hostetter, “A Weary Herakles at Harvard”; J. M. Hunt, “Apollonius Citharoedus”; Jefferds Huyck, “Vergil’s Phaethontiades”; Leo Mildenberg, “Numismatic Evidence”; Stephen Mitchell, “Imperial Building in the Eastern Roman Provinces”; Charles E. Murgia, “The Servian Commentary on Aeneid 3 Revisited”; Hayden Pelliccia, “Pindarus Homericus: Pythian 3.1–80”; GailAnn Rickert, “Akrasia and Euripides’ Medea”; Ruth Scodel, “Horace, Lucilius, and Callimachean Polemic”; D. R. Shackleton Bailey, “The Silvae of Statius”; Susan C. Shelmerdine, “Pindaric Praise and the Third Olympian”; Ronald Syme, “M. Bibulus and Four Sons”; Richard F. Thomas, “Prose into Poetry: Tradition and Meaning in Virgil’s Georgics”; W. S. Watt, “Notes on the Anthologia Latina”; and Clifford Weber, “Metrical Imitatio in the Proem to the Aeneid.”

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene