HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Hiraizumi in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 171

Hiraizumi

Buddhist Art and Regional Politics in Twelfth-Century Japan

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$63.00 • £50.95 • €56.50

ISBN 9780674392052

Publication Date: 01/15/1999

Short

296 pages

3 maps, 15 line-art, 88 halftones

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

  • Part I: Foundations
    • The Emishi
      • The Unruled East
      • The Emishi
      • Hitakarni
      • The Northern World
      • Taking the East
      • Buddhist Strategies
      • Barbarians over Barbarians
      • The Eniishi Wars
    • The Kitakami Rulers
      • The Fushũ
      • Rebellion in the North
      • A New Political Order
      • The Ōshō Wars
      • Kitakami Buddhism
      • A Fushū Nation?
  • Part II: Art and Politics at Hiraizumi
    • Kiyohjra
      • Kiyohira
      • Hiraizumi
      • Chūsonji
      • Another Temple
      • Sutra of Gold and Silver
      • Symbolisms
    • Motohira and Hidehira
      • Contests for Legitimacy
      • Strategies of Culture
      • Motohira
      • Hidehira
      • Hiraizumi
      • Mōtsūji
      • Kanjizaiōin
      • Muryōkōin
      • Sutra in Blue and Gold
      • A Splendid Domain
    • A Realm of Gold
      • House of Gold
      • The Mummies in the Altar
      • Three Generations at Konjikidō
      • Meaning in Anomaly
      • The Sutra Repository
      • Housing the Canon
      • Wutaishan Monju
      • A Golden World
  • Part III: Power in Art
    • The Fall of Hiraizumi
      • Crisis and Demise
      • A Final Transcription
      • King Kinrin
      • Prophylaxis
    • Art and Mandate
      • The Capital of Artists
      • Art Rhetoric 1981
      • Heterologies
  • Reference Matter
    • Notes
    • Bibliography
    • Index

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