Cover: A History of Modern Poetry, Volume I: From the 1890s to the High Modernist Mode, from Harvard University PressCover: A History of Modern Poetry, Volume I: From the 1890s to the High Modernist Mode in PAPERBACK

A History of Modern Poetry, Volume I: From the 1890s to the High Modernist Mode

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$66.50 • £53.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674399457

Publication Date: 05/16/1979

Short

  • Part One: Poetry Around the Turn of the Century
    • 1. British Poetry in the 1890s: Introduction
      • The Romantic Legacy
      • British Modes and Poets of the Decade
      • The Literary Milieu
    • 2. The Victorian Tradition and the Celtic Twilight
      • Sir William Watson
      • Stephen Phillips and “Michael Field”
      • Alice Meynell
      • Francis Thompson
      • The Celtic Twilight
      • Yeats
      • William Sharp
    • 3. Ars Victrix: The London Avant-Garde
      • Character of the Avant-Garde
      • L’Art pour l’art
      • Ernest Dowson
      • Lionel Johnson
      • The Decadence
      • Wratislaw
      • Barlas
      • Wilde’s Salome
      • Symbolism
      • Yeats
      • Symons’ The Symbolist Movement in Literature
      • Impressionism and Arthur Symons
      • Pater
    • 4. The Narrative Protest
      • Reactions Against the Poetry of Ars Victrix
      • Narrative Poets
      • Rudyard Kipling
      • John Davidson
      • Chesterton
      • Noyes
      • Masefield
    • 5. The American Milieu, 1890–1912
      • The Isolation of American Poets
      • Poetic Innocence
      • Preoccupation with England
      • The Recoil from Contemporary America
      • The Poetry Market
    • 6. The Beginnings of the Modern Movement in America
      • The Genteel Tradition
      • Santayana
      • Stickney
      • Lodge
      • Moody
      • Reese
      • Tabb
      • Reactions Against the Genteel Mode
      • The Vagabond Theme
      • Hovey and Carman
      • Edwin Markham: Poetry of Social Protest
      • Popular Entertainers and Newspaper Poets
      • Riley
      • Field
      • Crawford
      • Stephen Crane
      • Edwin Arlington Robinson
  • Part Two: Poetry in Rapport With a Public
    • 7. Transitions and Premises
      • The Dominant Mode
      • Poets and Schools
    • 8. Thomas Hardy
      • His Life
      • General Character of His Poetry
      • Style and Form
      • Tentative and Opposed Responses
      • The Philosophical Pessimist
      • The Sense of Vista
      • A Poet of Nature
      • The Dynasts
      • His Influence on Later Poets
    • 9. Craftsmen of the Beautiful and the Agreeable
      • General Characteristics of the Mode
      • Robert Bridges
      • Laurence Binyon
      • Sturge Moore
      • Walter de la Mare
      • Trevelyan, Hewlett, Belloc, and Flecker
      • Abercrombie and Bottomley
      • A. E. Housman
    • 10. The Georgian Poets
      • The Georgian Anthologies
      • Rupert Brooke
      • Georgian Realism
      • Gibson
      • The Georgian Countryside
      • Edward Thomas
      • W. H. Davies
      • Edmund Blunden
      • Ralph Hodgson
      • W. J. Turner
      • The Georgian Compromise
    • 11. Robert Frost
      • His Life
      • Frost and the Age
      • The Spoken Language
      • Dramatic Characterization
      • Poetry in the Familiar
      • Narrative Elements
      • The Personality of the Speaker
      • Unsaying the Romantics
      • Frostian Irony
    • 12. The Irish Scene
      • The Irish Milieu
      • Patriotic Verse
      • George Russell
      • Reaction Against the Celtic Twilight
      • James Stephens
      • Synge
      • The Folk Movement
      • Colum, Campbell, and F. R. Higgins
    • 13. Poetry of World War I
      • American Poets and the War
      • English Poets: The First Phase
      • Graves
      • Blunden
      • The Later Phase
      • Sassoon
      • Owen
      • Rosenberg
  • Part Three: Popular Modernism
    • 14. The New Poetry of America
      • Phases of the Modern Movement
      • The Reaction against the Genteel Mode
      • The Widening of Subject Matter
      • The Proliferation of Formal Experiment
      • The Spoken Language
      • Discontinuous Composition
      • Free Verse
      • The New Audience and Publishers
      • Little Magazines
      • The Contemporary Perception of Groups and Movements
    • 15. Imagism
      • The Imagist Movement
      • The Imagist Doctrine
      • The Imagist Poem
      • Aldington
      • H.D. Fletcher
      • Amy Lowell
      • Sir Herbert Read
    • 16. Poetry for a Democracy
      • Vachel Lindsay
      • Edgar Lee Masters
      • Carl Sandburg
      • John V. A. Weaver
      • Lola Ridge
    • 17. Conservative and Regional Poets of America
      • Sara Teasdale
      • Ridgeley Torrence
      • Donald Evans
      • Adelaide Crapsey
      • Edna St. Vincent Millay
      • Elinor Wylie
      • Robert Hillyer
      • Conrad Aiken
      • The Benéts
      • Regional Poetry
    • 18. Black Poets of America: The First Phase
      • Types and History of Black Poetry
      • Poets of the Turn of the Century
      • Paul Lawrence Dunbar
      • W. S. Braithwaite
      • Fenton Johnson
      • Claude McKay
      • Jean Toomer
      • Countie Cullen
      • Langston Hughes
      • James Weldon Johnson
      • Sterling Brown
    • 19. British Poetry After the War, 1918–1928
      • Modernist and Traditional Modes
      • Beginnings of the New Criticism
      • Richard Church
      • A. E. Coppard
      • Andrew Young
      • Robert Graves
      • Wheels
      • Edith Sitwell
      • Aldous Huxley
      • Harold Monro
      • Edgell Rickword
      • D. H. Lawrence
  • Part Four: The Beginnings of the High Modernist Mode
    • 20. Ezra Pound: The Early Career
      • The High Modernist Mode
      • Pound before Imagism
      • Pound’s Modernization: The First Phase
      • Ford Maddox Hueffer
      • T. E. Hulme
      • Efficient Style
      • Fenollosa’s “Essay on the Chinese Written Character”
      • Vorticism
      • i>Cathay. Lustra
      • Homage to Sextus Propertius
      • Pound’s Modernization: The Second Phase
      • The Ur Cantos
      • Eliot and Joyce
      • The Fourth Canto
      • Douglas and the Economic System
      • “Hugh Selwyn Mauberley”
      • The Cantos
      • Later Life
    • 21. T. S. Eliot: The Early Career
      • Early Life
      • The Encounter with Laforgue
      • England and Marriage
      • A Growing Reputation
      • The Waste Land
      • The Urban Setting
      • Leitmotifs
      • The “Mythical Method”
      • Allusion
      • The Condition of Man
      • Eliot’s Criticism
      • Later Life
    • 22. The New York Avant-Garde: Stevens and Williams to the Early 1920s and Marianne Moore
      • Others
      • Alfred Kreymborg
      • Stieglitz
      • The Armory Show
      • A Compressed Idiom
      • Mina Loy
      • Maxwell Bodenheim
      • Wallace Stevens
      • William Carlos Williams
      • Marianne Moore
    • 23. William Butler Yeats
      • Early Life
      • His Father
      • Occult Lore
      • Symbolism and Reverie
      • Irish Nationalism
      • Maud Gonne
      • The Rhymers’ Club
      • Remaking a Self, 1899–1914
      • The Abbey Theatre
      • A New Level of Achievement, 1914–1928
      • Ezra Pound and Noh Drama
      • A Vision
      • A System of Symbols
      • Yeatsian Talk
      • Thinking in Antitheses
      • Yeats’s Last Decade
      • Yeats and the Modern Movements in Poetry
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index

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