HISTORY OF WOMEN IN THE WEST
Cover: History of Women in the West, Volume III: Renaissance and the Enlightenment Paradoxes, from Harvard University PressCover: History of Women in the West, Volume III: Renaissance and the Enlightenment Paradoxes in PAPERBACK

History of Women in the West, Volume III: Renaissance and the Enlightenment Paradoxes

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$34.50 • £27.95 • €31.00

ISBN 9780674403673

Publication Date: 03/15/1995

Short

608 pages

6-1/4 x 9-1/4 inches

49 halftones

Belknap Press

History of Women in the West

World

Volume III of A History of Women draws a richly detailed picture of women in early modern Europe, considering them in a context of work, marriage, and family. At the heart of this volume is “woman” as she appears in a wealth of representations, from simple woodcuts and popular literature to master paintings; and as the focal point of a debate—sometimes humorous, sometimes acrimonious—conducted in every field: letters, arts, philosophy, the sciences, and medicine. Against oppressive experience, confining laws, and repetitious claims about female “nature,” women took initiative by quiet maneuvers and outright dissidence. In conformity and resistance, in image and reality, women from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries emerge from these pages in remarkable diversity.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

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In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene