Cover: A History of Young People in the West, Volume II: Stormy Evolution to Modern Times, from Harvard University PressCover: A History of Young People in the West, Volume II: Stormy Evolution to Modern Times in PAPERBACK

A History of Young People in the West, Volume II: Stormy Evolution to Modern Times

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$38.00 • £30.95 • €34.00

ISBN 9780674404083

Publication Date: 11/15/1999

Short

448 pages

6-3/8 x 9-1/4 inches

1 map, 1 chart, 68 halftones

Belknap Press

A History of Young People in the West

World

  • 1. Images of Youth in the Modern Period [Giovanni Romano]
  • 2. The Military Experience [Sabrina Loriga]
  • 3. “Doing Youth” in the Village [Daniel Fabre]
  • 4. Worker Youth: From the Workshop to the Factory [Michelle Perrot]
  • 5. Young People in School: Middle and High School Students in France and Europe [Jean-Claude Caron]
  • 6. Young Rebels and Revolutionaries, 1789–1917 [Sergio Luzzatto]
  • 7. The Myth of Youth in Images: Italian Fascism [Laura Malvano, translated by Keith Botsford]
  • 8. Soldiers of an Idea: Young People under the Third Reich [Eric Michaud]
  • 9. Youth as a Metaphor for Social Change: Fascist Italy and America in the 1950s [Luisa Passerini]
  • Notes
  • Contributors
  • Index

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