Cover: Sources of Knowledge: On the Concept of a Rational Capacity for Knowledge, from Harvard University PressCover: Sources of Knowledge in HARDCOVER

Sources of Knowledge

On the Concept of a Rational Capacity for Knowledge

Andrea Kern

Translated by Daniel Smyth

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$38.00 • £30.95 • €34.00

ISBN 9780674416116

Publication Date: 01/02/2017

Text

304 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

World

  • Introduction: “But We Can Always Err!”
  • Part One: Knowledge and Reason
    • I. Finite Knowledge
      • 1. Who Are “We”? A Kantian Answer
      • 2. Knowledge from the Standpoint of Reason
      • 3. The Dogma: Justification without Truth
      • 4. The Puzzle: Truth-Guaranteeing Grounds
    • II. Finite Justification
      • 1. Agrippa’s Trilemma
      • 2. Two Answers to Agrippa’s Trilemma
      • 3. The Category of a Truth-Guaranteeing Ground
      • 4. Are We Familiar with Grounds Belonging to This Category?
      • 5. The Role of Perceptual Grounds
  • Part Two: The Primacy of Knowledge
    • III. Doubting Knowledge
      • 1. Objectivity and the Possibility of Error
      • 2. The Paradox of Knowledge
      • 3. Is Philosophy Necessarily Skeptical?
    • IV. The Dilemma of Epistemology
      • 1. The General Redemptive Strategy: Less Is More!
      • 2. The Internalist Variant
      • 3. The Externalist Variant
      • 4. The Paradox Returns
    • V. What Are Grounds?
      • 1. The Rigorous Reading: Hume and Kant
      • 2. Grounds and Facts
      • 3. A Transcendental Argument
      • 4. Causality or Normativity: A False Dichotomy
      • 5. The Primacy of Knowledge
  • Part Three: The Nature of Knowledge
    • VI. Rational Capacities
      • 1. The Category of a Rational Capacity
      • 2. Rational Capacities as Constitutive Unities
      • 3. Habits and Regulative Rules
      • 4. The Normativity of Rational Capacities
      • 5. Aristotle’s Conception of a dynamis meta logou
      • 6. Rational Capacities as Self-Conscious, Normative Explanations
    • VII. Rational Capacities for Knowledge
      • 1. Knowledge as Rational Capacity
      • 2. Knowledge of the Explanation of Knowledge
      • 3. Knowledge as Self-Conscious Act
      • 4. Knowledge and Non-Accidentality
    • VIII. Rational Capacities and Circumstances
      • 1. The Asymmetry of Knowledge and Error
      • 2. Favorable and Unfavorable Circumstances
      • 3. Fallible Capacities and Knowledge
      • 4. Doxastic Responsibility and Knowledge
  • Part Four: The Teleology of Knowledge
    • IX. The Teleology of Rational Capacities
      • 1. Virtue Epistemology and “Epistemic Capacities”: A Critique
      • 2. Rational Capacities as a Species of Teleological Causality: A Kantian Approach
      • 3. Kant’s Refutation of the Idea of an “Implanted Subjective Disposition”
      • 4. Knowledge as a Self-Constituting Capacity
    • X. Knowledge and Practice
      • 1. Rational Capacities and Practice
      • 2. How Does One Acquire a Rational Capacity for Knowledge?
      • 3. Knowledge and Objectivity
      • 4. Skepticism and Philosophy
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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