HARVARD STUDIES IN CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY
Cover: Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, Volume 108 in HARDCOVER

Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, Volume 108

Edited by Richard F. Thomas

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$50.00 • £40.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780674417540

Publication Date: 05/30/2016

Text

600 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

2 halftones, 2 line illustrations

Harvard University Department of the Classics > Harvard Studies in Classical Philology

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This volume includes Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui, “‘Trust the God’: Tharsein in Ancient Greek Religion”; Jordi Pàmias, “Acusilaus of Argos and the Bronze Tablets”; Karen Rosenbecker, “‘Just Desserts’: Reversals of Fortune, Feces, Flatus, and Food in Aristophanes’ Wealth”; Yosef Z. Liebersohn, “Crito’s Character in Plato’s Crito”; Alexandros Kampakoglou, “Staging the Divine: Epiphany and Apotheosis in Callimachus HE 1121–1124”; Christopher Eckerman, “Muses, Metaphor, and Metapoetics in Catullus 61”; Christopher P. Jones, “The Greek Letters Ascribed to Brutus”; Jefferds Huyck, “Another Sort of Misogyny: Aeneid 9.140–141”; Mark Heerink, “Hylas, Hercules, and Valerius Flaccus’ Metamorphosis of the Aeneid”; Lowell Edmunds, “Pliny the Younger on His Verse and Martial’s Non-Recognition of Pliny as a Poet”; Eleanor Cowan, “Caesar’s One Fatal Wound: Suetonius Divus Iulius 82.3”; Graeme Bourke, “Classical Sophism and Philosophy in Pseudo-Plutarch On the Training of Children”; Jarrett T. Welsh, “Verse Quotations from Festus”; Benjamin Garstad, “Rome in the Alexander Romance”; James N. Adams, “The Latin of the Magerius (Smirat) Mosaic”; Lucia Floridi, “The Construction of a Homoerotic Discourse in the Epigrams of Ausonius”; Massimilliano Vitiello, “Emperor Theodosius’ Liberty and the Roman Past”; and Thomas Keeline and Stuart M. McManus, “Benjamin Larnell, the Last Latin Poet at Harvard Indian College.”

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