Cover: English Romantic Irony, from Harvard University PressCover: English Romantic Irony in E-DITION

English Romantic Irony

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E-DITION

$65.00 • £54.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674420717

Publication Date: 09/08/1980

219 pages

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Anne Mellor here offers the conceptual framework for a better understanding of the Romantic writers. The Romantics are usually seen as expressing a secularized version of the divinely ordered universe. Ms. Mellor now demonstrates another strain in Romanticism, one linked to the philosophical skepticism and social turbulence of the age: a conception of the universe as random motion.

The artist who sees the world as constantly in flux will simultaneously create and de-create his own fictive structures. Examining such central texts as Byron’s Don Juan, Keats’s odes, and Carlyle’s Sartor Resartus, Ms. Mellor shows how myths and symbols are affirmed and denied.

Romantic irony is fundamentally a positive response to change; but in Coleridge the author finds the perception of chaos engendering guilt; and in Lewis Carroll and existentialist writers, fear. Lewis Carroll marks a transition to the twentieth century when the Romantic ebullience in the face of instability can no longer be shared.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene