Cover: Pan-Africanism and East African Integration, from Harvard University PressCover: Pan-Africanism and East African Integration in E-DITION

Pan-Africanism and East African Integration

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Product Details

E-DITION

$65.00 • £54.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674421394

Publication Date: 01/01/1965

307 pages

World

Related Subjects

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The avowed commitment of African leaders to the rapid economic development of their respective countries is frequently expressed through the ideology of Pan-Africanism which aims at overcoming territorial problems and eventually achieving some form of national unity. Joseph Nye’s analysis of the East African experience provides an excellent representative example of the impact of Pan-Africanism on the cooperative arrangements among new states and their efforts to form a federation. Based on more than one hundred interviews with African leaders as well as other primary material, his book arrives at new conclusions on Pan-Africanism that are both illuminating and widely applicable.

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