HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Plucking Chrysanthemums: Narushima Ryūhoku and Sinitic Literary Traditions in Modern Japan, from Harvard University PressCover: Plucking Chrysanthemums in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 390

Plucking Chrysanthemums

Narushima Ryūhoku and Sinitic Literary Traditions in Modern Japan

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$65.00 • £52.95 • €58.50

ISBN 9780674425224

Publication Date: 11/21/2016

Text

498 pages

7 x 10 inches

25 halftones, 4 maps, 3 tables

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

Just as Narushima Ryūhoku was one of the preeminent writers of his era in the realm of Sinitic Japanese literature (kanshibun), so has his biographer Matthew Fraleigh become a leader among the growing number of scholars working to revive this once vibrant literary space. Plucking Chrysanthemums and its companion work, New Chronicles of Yanagibashi and Diary of a Journey to the West, at once compellingly elucidate kanshibun texts and vividly describe the culture in which they were created and received.—H. Mack Horton, University of California, Berkeley

With Matthew Fraleigh’s new book, a great oversight in the tale of Japan’s early road to modernity is now finally being remedied. His study demonstrates the importance of kanbun as a written language of nineteenth-century modernization and drives home the forgotten truth that, if we wish to grasp more fully the mindsets of Japanese caught in the transition toward the modern age, we must also read the vast output of Sinitic poetry and prose of the Meiji period. Narushima Ryūhoku is indeed an emblematic figure in this process.—Ivo Smits, Leiden University

Japan’s preeminent poet and social critic in the two decades leading up to the advent of the modern novel, Narushima Ryūhoku is today sadly relegated to the backwaters of literary history. Fraleigh’s beautifully written and precisely documented history of the writer’s turn from samurai to official ‘field’ journalist leads the reader to consider how literary discourses would come, albeit briefly, to inform the political and economic realities of late nineteenth-century Japan. Highly recommended for all students of classical and modern Asian culture.—Robert Campbell, University of Tokyo

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