Cover: Evolution of African Mammals, from Harvard University PressCover: Evolution of African Mammals in E-DITION

Evolution of African Mammals

Available from De Gruyter »

Product Details

E-DITION

$65.00 • £54.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674431263

Publication Date: 02/01/1979

641 pages

77 line drawings, 66 halftones

World

Harvard University Press has partnered with De Gruyter to make available for sale worldwide virtually all in-copyright HUP books that had become unavailable since their original publication. The 2,800 titles in the “e-ditions” program can be purchased individually as PDF eBooks or as hardcover reprint (“print-on-demand”) editions via the “Available from De Gruyter” link above. They are also available to institutions in ten separate subject-area packages that reflect the entire spectrum of the Press’s catalog. More about the E-ditions Program »

The recent explosion of publications on African prehistory has forced researchers in vertebrate evolution to sift through countless details of morphology, distribution and geological setting. Now, to simplify access to this information, Vincent Maglio and H.B.S. Cooke have prepared a single volume that summarizes our current knowledge about the origin and evolution of the Class Mammalia in Africa. Their book, consequently, is of great importance, and much of its material derives from ongoing research not available in any other published form.

In thirty chapters, fifteen mammalian orders are described in detail—their taxonomic groupings; the origins of their various subgroups; geographical distributions; major phyletic units; and specific evolutionary trends. Numerous illustrations accompany the text, and complete bibliographic references are given for each group. The modern mammalian fauna of Africa is summarized, with a description of the environments in which it is found. Man’s impact on wildlife is also assessed. The major geological deposits of the African Cenozoic are reviewed, and the broader patterns of faunal evolution are synthesized in an attempt to cut across taxonomic boundaries and demonstrate the interdependence of faunal events on the continent as a whole.

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