Cover: Keats and the Bostonians: Amy Lowell, Louise Imogen Guiney, Louis Arthur Holman, Fred Holland Day, from Harvard University PressCover: Keats and the Bostonians in E-DITION

Keats and the Bostonians

Amy Lowell, Louise Imogen Guiney, Louis Arthur Holman, Fred Holland Day

Available from De Gruyter »

Product Details

E-DITION

$65.00 • £54.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674433571

Publication Date: 01/01/1951

209 pages

8 halftones

World

Harvard University Press has partnered with De Gruyter to make available for sale worldwide virtually all in-copyright HUP books that had become unavailable since their original publication. The 2,800 titles in the “e-ditions” program can be purchased individually as PDF eBooks or as hardcover reprint (“print-on-demand”) editions via the “Available from De Gruyter” link above. They are also available to institutions in ten separate subject-area packages that reflect the entire spectrum of the Press’s catalog. More about the E-ditions Program »

Keats scholarship in general has an unusually interesting history and it has involved some eminent—and odd—Bostonians in particular: Louise Imogen Guiney, poet and essayist; Amy Lowell, Keats’ biographer; Louis A. Holman, renowned collector of Keatsiana; and Fred Holland Day, eccentric printer, photographer, and bibliophile. More than 100 hitherto unpublished letters of the group, and a delightful Introduction by Hyder Edward Rollins, make up this book. It includes vivid character sketches of the Boston coterie; the diverting story, here related for the first time, of the Fanny Brawne–Fanny Keats letters (around which centered the feuds and friendships of these Keats enthusiasts); and an account of how Amy Lowell gathered the materials for her famous biography of Keats. Altogether, Keats and the Bostonians is a delightful and amusing book.

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket, Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter, by Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, from Harvard University Press

Technology, Biology, Chronology

Fears and anxieties about the latest technologies are nothing new, say Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, authors of Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter. But neither is the fact that they often provide new ways for us to connect and socialize. Mark Twain is rumored to have said “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” Of late, much press has been spent on uncovering those rhymes, focusing on the similarities between the current epidemic and past ones. These stories underscore the lesson that progress hasn't allowed us to escape the suffering of earlier