RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION BOOKS AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS
Cover: Inequality Reexamined, from Harvard University PressCover: Inequality Reexamined in PAPERBACK

Inequality Reexamined

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$30.00 • £24.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780674452565

Publication Date: 03/15/1995

Academic Trade

224 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

Russell Sage Foundation Books at Harvard University Press

North America only

The noted economist and philosopher Amartya Sen argues that the dictum “all people are created equal” serves largely to deflect attention from the fact that we differ in age, gender, talents, and physical abilities as well as in material advantages and social background. He argues for concentrating on higher and more basic values: individual capabilities and freedom to achieve objectives. By concentrating on the equity and efficiency of social arrangements in promoting freedoms and capabilities of individuals, Sen adds an important new angle to arguments about such vital issues as gender inequalities, welfare policies, affirmative action, and public provision of health care and education.

Awards & Accolades

  • Amartya Sen Is a 2011 National Humanities Medal Winner
  • Amartya Sen Is Winner of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economics
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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene