HARVARD-YENCHING INSTITUTE MONOGRAPH SERIES
Cover: Public Memory in Early China, from Harvard University PressCover: Public Memory in Early China in HARDCOVER

Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series 91

Public Memory in Early China

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$69.95 • £55.95 • €63.00

ISBN 9780674492035

Publication Date: 06/23/2014

Text

526 pages

6 x 9 inches

10 halftones, 10 line illustrations, 3 tables

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series

World

  • List of Tables and Figures*
  • Conventions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction: Han memorial culture
    • 1. “Repeated Inking” and the backdrop of a manuscript culture
    • 2. “Continuous Chanting” and the backdrop of an oral culture
    • 3. Inking and Chanting share their secret of longevity
  • I. Names as positioning the self
    • 4. The ancestor’s given names as locative markers
    • 5. The ancestor’s surname as a spatial marker
    • 6. Following the named lineage back through time
  • II. Age as positioning the self
    • 7. The age of childhood
    • 8. The age of adulthood
    • 9. The age of advanced years
    • 10. The age of afterlife
  • III. Kinship as positioning the self
    • 12. Weakening personal agency
    • 13. Strengthening interpersonal bonds
    • 14. A dynamic relationship net
  • IV. The tangible tools of positioning the self
    • 15. Calling cards and the trafficking of names
    • 16. The ancestral shrine and its tools of remembrance
    • 17. The cemetary and its tools of remembrance
    • 18. Commemorative portraiture as a tool of remembrance
  • V. The intangible tools of positioning the self
    • 19. Reduction
    • 20. Conversion
    • 21. Association
  • Conclusion: “Here is where the Earl of Shao rested”
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Tables and Figures
    • Tables
      • 1. A sample of male and female personal names from the Zoumalou records
      • 2. The bounties of seniority, by age and administrative grade
      • 3. The decreasing frequency of sacrifices
    • Figures
      • 1. The stele of Jing Yun, magistrate of Quren, erected 173 CE, from Yunyang County, Sichuan
      • 2. Eastern Han relief of students bearing books, from Ducheng, Shandong
      • 3. Eastern Han inscription urging descendants of a thrice venerable to continue observing his name taboo, from Zhejiang Province
      • 4. Jörg Breu’s “Steps of life”
      • 5. A woman’s version of “The different stages of life”
      • 6. Simple summary of the lifeline, as envisioned in the postmedieval West
      • 7. The stele of Xianyu Huang, erected 165 CE, from Tianjin Municipal Region
      • 8. Simple summary of the life line, as envisioned in early imperial China
      • 9. The First Emperor of Qin fails to dredge up the royal tripods, in a late Eastern Han stone relief from Tengzhou, Shandong
      • 10. An Eastern Han cemetary at Yanshi, Henan
      • 11. The Kong Zhou stele, erected 164 CE, from Qufu, Shandong
      • 12. A common mid-Han labeling tag, dated 12 BCE, from Eji-na, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region
      • 13. The birchleaf pear beside an homage-receiving lord, from an Eastern Han tomb at Jiaxiang, Shandong

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