WONDERS OF THE WORLD
Cover: Vesuvius, from Harvard University PressCover: Vesuvius in PAPERBACK

Vesuvius

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$30.00 • £24.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780674503779

Publication Date: 05/04/2015

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256 pages

34 halftones

Wonders of the World

North America only

A lively biography of the mountain best known for swallowing Pompeii and Herculaneum in 79 A.D.… Vesuvius is an entertaining guide to the volcano’s impact on European culture, ranging over its influence on religion, science, philosophy, art, literature, and music.—Amy Henderson, The Weekly Standard

Most readers will enjoy this attractive little book as an armchair travel guide to Vesuvius along the paths of history.—David Keymer, Library Journal

The terrifying meditations on our own mortality are compensated by the vivid lives that have unfolded for so many centuries on the mountain’s slopes (most of them lives in which Vesuvius has been threatening but not fatal). As a book, Vesuvius promises to be just about irresistible.—Ingrid Rowland, University of Notre Dame

It’s brave to write a longue durée history of anything, and here it has been done magnificently. There was much in every part that was new to me.—Martin Rudwick, author of Bursting the Limits of Time

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene