ADAMS FAMILY CORRESPONDENCE
Cover: Adams Family Correspondence, Volume 12: March 1797 – April 1798, from Harvard University PressCover: Adams Family Correspondence, Volume 12 in HARDCOVER

Adams Family Correspondence, Volume 12

March 1797 – April 1798

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$104.00 • £83.95 • €93.50

ISBN 9780674504660

Publication Date: 06/09/2015

Text

  • Descriptive List of Illustrations*
  • Introduction
    • 1. The Second President
    • 2. A New First Lady
    • 3. Changing European Perspectives
    • 4. This Side of the Atlantic
    • 5. Notes on Editorial Method
    • 6. Related Digital Resources
  • Acknowledgments
  • Guide to Editorial Apparatus
    • 1. Textual Devices
    • 2. Adams Family Code Names
    • 3. Descriptive Symbols
    • 4. Location Symbols
    • 5. Other Abbreviations and Conventional Terms
    • 6. Short Titles of Works Frequently Cited
  • Family Correspondence, March 1797–April 1798
  • Appendix: List of Omitted Documents
  • Chronology
  • Index
  • * Illustrations
    • 1. Thomas Boylston Adams’ French Passport, 8 May 1797 (An. V, 19 Floréal)
    • 2, 3. Anna (Nancy) Greenleaf and William Cranch, ca. 1795
    • 4. William Blount, ca. 1790
    • 5, 6. Abigail Adams and John Adams, by James Sharples, ca. 1797
    • 7. “Le Général Bonaparte Proclamant la République Cisalpine à Milan le 9 Juillet 1797,” by Louis Lafitte, 1813
    • 8. “What a Beastly Action,” 1798
    • 9. “A Solemn Humiliation under the Reign of John Adams,” by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, ca. 1798
    • 10. “USS Constitution,” by Michele Felice Cornè, ca. 1803
    • 11. “The Presidents March: A New Federal Song,” ca. 1798

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