Cover: The Annotated Lincoln, from Harvard University PressCover: The Annotated Lincoln in HARDCOVER

The Annotated Lincoln

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$39.95 • £31.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674504837

Publication Date: 02/15/2016

Trade

640 pages

9 x 9-1/2 inches

100 color illustrations

Belknap Press

World

The selections represent Lincoln’s development, both politically and intellectually, as well as the maturation of his communication skills… It is a beautifully printed and designed book, extensively illustrated. From the collector’s standpoint, we were excited to see many pieces of Lincolniana we were not familiar with.The Rail Splitter

A tour de force, as one would expect from such meticulous and gifted writers as Harold Holzer and Thomas Horrocks. It will appeal to anyone interested in Lincoln and the Civil War.—William C. Harris, author of Lincoln and the Border States: Preserving the Union

The Annotated Lincoln is the kind of book that all Lincoln buffs will treasure, and it’s one of those rare volumes that can help transform a casual reader into a serious student of America’s greatest president. It reveals the often-elusive Lincoln in an unforgettable manner.—Matthew Pinsker, author of Lincoln’s Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers’ Home

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