Cover: The Language of Power, the Power of Language in PAPERBACK

LeBaron Russell Briggs Prize Honors Essays in English 1987

The Language of Power, the Power of Language

The Effects of Ambiguity on Sociopolitical Structures as Illustrated in Shakespeare’s Plays

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$6.30 • £5.95 • €5.50

ISBN 9780674510562

Publication Date: 07/26/1988

Short

In a fusion of historicist and deconstructive reading strategies, Stephen Cohen asserts the fundamental force of ambiguity on social and political structures in Othello, Macbeth, The Merchant of Venice, and Measure for Measure. He argues that there is an inherently “radical” ambiguity which cannot be controlled by countries or wits. Drawing from the works of a wide range of critics, including Jacques Derrida and Stephen Greenblatt, Cohen show how language itself erodes usurpers’ intentions to shape a world according to their own designs. His account of the transactions between author and reader provides a skeptical critique of readings that remove the loose ends that such “radical” ambiguities impart to the text.

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