Cover: Legislating Together: The White House and Capitol Hill from Eisenhower to Reagan, from Harvard University PressCover: Legislating Together in PAPERBACK

Legislating Together

The White House and Capitol Hill from Eisenhower to Reagan

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$38.00 • £30.95 • €34.00

ISBN 9780674524163

Publication Date: 01/01/1993

Short

360 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

17 tables

World

Related Subjects

This may well be the best analysis extant of congressional–executive relationships in regard to legislation.—Aaron Wildavsky, University of California, Berkeley

Mark Peterson has undertaken a project that is rare in the field of presidential congressional relations. He has identified 5,069 presidential domestic policy proposals from Eisenhower to Reagan (through 1984) and sampled 299 for quantitative analysis. The project’s comprehensiveness sets Peterson’s work apart… Peterson has provided an extremely valuable study, for both the insights he has generated, and the role model he has created for others who study presidential–congressional relations.—Gary R. Covington, Journal of Politics

This book contributes positively to a new and improved understanding of presidential–congressional relations… [It] tackles a large topic and the author sensibly narrows it by concentrating on domestic policy and on the president’s legislative initiatives… [Legislating Together] deserves the attention it will receive as a contribution to better understanding of the interaction between the White House and Congress.—Charles O. Jones, Political Science Quarterly

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