Cover: The Letters of William Lloyd Garrison, Volume III: No Union with the Slaveholders in HARDCOVER

The Letters of William Lloyd Garrison, Volume III: No Union with the Slaveholders

1841–1849

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$147.00 • £117.95 • €132.50

ISBN 9780674526624

Publication Date: 01/01/1974

Short

750 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

15 halftones

Belknap Press

The Letters of William Lloyd Garrison

World

As early as 1842, William Lloyd Garrison advanced the idea of disunion, arguing that the Constitution was “a covenant with death.” Distressed by Calhoun’s signing of the annexation treaty for Texas, he prophesied that civil war was inevitable. Though plagued by illness and death in his immediate family throughout the years covered in this volume, Garrison drove himself to win supporters for the radical abolitionist cause. In 1846 he traveled to Great Britain, denouncing the Free Church of Scotland for accepting funds from South Carolina. While in England he lectured often with Frederick Douglass; the two embarked the following year on a grueling lecture tour of the western United States, heretofore the exclusive domain of moderate abolitionists. In 1848, despite the objections of close friends, Garrison held the controversial Anti-Sabbath Convention in Boston. Throughout these years he continued to write extensively for the Liberator and involved himself in a variety of liberal causes; in 1849 he publicized and circulated in Massachusetts the earliest petition for women’s suffrage.

Recent News

From Our Blog

Photo of Lucia Jacobs as a child sitting next to Oaky

How to Plant a Forest

For this week’s University Press Week Blog Tour, Lucia Jacobs offers us a glimpse of environmental stewardship as seen through the activities of the ubiquitous squirrel, a species native to the Americas, Africa, and Eurasia from the Eocene Epoch onward. Lucia Jacobs is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the

‘manifold glories of classical Greek and Latin’

The digital Loeb Classical Library (loebclassics.com) extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature.