Cover: The Boatman: Henry David Thoreau’s River Years, from Harvard University PressCover: The Boatman in HARDCOVER

The Boatman

Henry David Thoreau’s River Years

  • List of Figures*
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • 1. Moccasin Print
  • 2. Colonial Village
  • 3. American Canal
  • 4. Transition
  • 5. Port Concord
  • 6. Wild Waters
  • 7. River Sojourns
  • 8. Consultant
  • 9. Mapmaker
  • 10. Genius
  • 11. Saving the Meadows
  • 12. Reversal of Fortune
  • Conclusion
  • Epilogue
  • Abbreviations
  • Notes
  • References
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Figures
    • Frontispiece. Replica of Thoreau’s most well known boat, Musketaquid
    • 1. Scroll map (1859)
    • 2. Dunshee ambrotype (photo) of Henry David Thoreau (1862)
    • 3. Confluence of Thoreau’s three rivers (1899)
    • 4. Map of Thoreau’s three rivers
    • 5. Western attic window of Thoreau family home
    • 6. Thoreau’s boat place
    • 7. Billerica dam in winter
    • 8. Envelope with numbers (1859)
    • 9. Paleo-Indian projectile point
    • 10. Map of Thoreau’s three watersheds
    • 11. Lawnlike meadow
    • 12. Factory canal, Maynard, MA
    • 13. Dredging Musketaquid (1895)
    • 14. Picturesque hemlocks (1880)
    • 15. Causeway and bridge in flood (1901)
    • 16. Two river voyageurs (1892)
    • 17. Choppy sea (1920)
    • 18. Double shadow of boating companions (1854)
    • 19. Sudbury River after ice breakup
    • 20A. Simplified replica of scroll map, part 1 of 4
    • 20B. Simplified replica of scroll map, part 2 of 4
    • 20C. Simplified replica of scroll map, part 3 of 4
    • 20D. Simplified replica of scroll map, part 4 of 4
    • 21. Leaning Hemlocks (1899)
    • 22. Detail of scroll map (1859)
    • 23. River profiles (1861)

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