Cover: Somme: Into the Breach, from Harvard University PressCover: Somme in HARDCOVER

Somme

Into the Breach

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HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674545199

Publication Date: 08/15/2016

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656 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

65 halftones, 21 maps

Belknap Press

United States and its dependencies only

  • List of Illustrations*
  • List of Maps**
  • Maps
  • Note to the Reader
  • 1. Great Expectations
  • 2. Paradise Lost
  • 3. A Gentleman’s Agreement
  • 4. The Build-Up
  • 5. Fatal Flaw
  • 6. The First Blows
  • 7. False Dawn
  • 8. Hunter-Bunter’s Folly
  • 9. Rattling the Cage
  • 10. Neither Fish Nor Fowl
  • 11. Achilles Heel
  • 12. An Opportunity Missed
  • 13. Of Moles and Men
  • 14. Land of Hope and Glory
  • 15. Bull’s Eye
  • 16. The Attack
  • 17. Repercussions
  • 18. Can’t See the Wood for the Trees
  • 19. Big Bang
  • 20. Surrounded
  • 21. Repulsed
  • 22. A Terrible Mistake
  • 23. Sacrifice of the Australians
  • 24. The Charge
  • 25. An Eye for an Eye
  • 26. The Check
  • 27. On Parole
  • 28. Second Time Lucky
  • 29. Counter-Attack
  • 30. The Back Door
  • 31. Butchers
  • 32. The Human Factor
  • 33. Shell-Shocked
  • 34. Last Throw of the Dice
  • 35. Bloodlust
  • 36. The Caterpillars
  • 37. Hard Times
  • 38. Ambushed
  • 39. Weather Permitting
  • Notes
  • Select Bibliography
  • Acknowledgements
  • Index
  • * Illustrations
    • Section 1
      • 1. The explosion of the mine under Hawthorn Redoubt, near Beaumont Hamel, on 1 July 1916 (IWM Q 754).
      • 2. Lieutenant-General Sir Aylmer Hunter-Weston, VIII Corps’ commander (IWM Q 13307).
      • 3. Cameraman Lieutenant Geoffrey Malins, who filmed the explosion (Hilary Morgan/Alamy Stock Photo).
      • 4. Major-General Henry de Beauvoir de Lisle addresses some of the troops from the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers, 29 June 1916 (IWM Q 738).
      • 5. Men from the 29th Division prepare for the attack on Beaumont Hamel at White City (IWM Q 796).
      • 6. and 7. Famous photographs of the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers taken from Geoffrey Malins’ Battle of the Somme film (IWM Q 744 and FLM 1672).
      • 8. General Sir Henry Rawlinson, the commander of the British 4th Army (Library of Congress).
      • 9. General Sir Douglas Haig seen with General Joseph Joffre, the irascible commander of the French Army, and David Lloyd George (Library of Congress).
      • 10. Mametz in ruins after the British 4th Army captured the village on 1 July 1916 (IWM Q 773).
      • 11. The enormous crater south of La Boisselle.
      • 12. British miners with their listening equipment, seen in one of their mines (IWM Q 115).
      • 13–16. Four officers who died on 1 July 1916: 13 Lieutenant Morris Bickersteth of the 15th West Yorkshire Regiment (© Rugby School Archives); 14 Captain Billie Nevill of the 8th East Surreys (© Twickenham Museum); 15 Captain Charlie May of the 22nd Manchester Regiment with his wife, Maude, and daughter, Pauline (© Manchester Regiment Archive and Tameside MBC); 16 Captain Alfred Bland of the 22nd Manchester Regiment with his wife, Violet (© the Bland family).
      • 17. Lieutenant Kenneth Macardle of the 17th Manchester Regiment (IWM HU 37057).
      • 18. Sergeant Harry Tawney of the 22nd Manchester Regiment.
      • 19. Sister Edith Appleton, a nurse at the hospital at Étretat (from www.anurseatthefront.org.uk/thebook and www.anurseatthefront.org.uk).
      • 20. British gunners prepare their 12-inch howitzer in Aveluy Wood (IWM Q 1339).
      • 21. A captured machine-gun post at Glatz Redoubt (IWM Q 870).
    • Section 2
      • 22. Lieutenant-Colonel Frank Crozier, commander of the 9th Royal Irish Rifles.
      • 23. Aerial photograph of the trench system within Schwaben Redoubt (IWM HU 91107).
      • 24. Dugouts and trenches in Thiepval Wood (IWM Q 871).
      • 25–28. Some of the weapons used by the British Army (IWM: Q 3987/Q 3996/Q 4115/Q 4196).
      • 29. An early attack on Trônes Wood.
      • 30. Lieutenant-Colonel Frank Maxwell VC.
      • 31. Delville Wood after the battles fought in it (IWM Q 4417).
      • 32. Longueval after it had been pulverized by British and German shells (IWM Q 1388).
      • 33. Australian prisoners following the fighting at Fromelles on 19–20 July 1916 (AWM 552_1).
      • 34. Major-General James McCay, the commander of the 5th Australian Division (AWM H 01890).
      • 35. Lieutenant-Colonel Walter Cass, the commander of the 54th Australian Battalion (AWM A 01470).
      • 36. Brigadier-General Harold ‘Pompey’ Elliott, commander of the Australian 15th Brigade at Fromelles (AWM H 15596).
      • 37. Pozières village as it was before the war, with the Albert to Bapaume road running through it (AWM G 015341).
      • 38. The Chalk Pit south of Pozières, one of the landmarks passed by all soldiers on the way to the front at Pozières (AWM EZ 0112).
      • 39. The remains of ‘Gibraltar’, the fortified tower near Pozières (AWM P 09114).
      • 40. An Australian soldier, wearing a German pickelhaube helmet, celebrates the capture of Pozières on 23 July 1916 with a shave (IWM 4041).
      • 41. The remains of the ‘OG’ (Old German) line (AWM E 00007).
    • Section 3
      • 42. Brigadier-General John Gellibrand and staff in Sausage Valley (AWM EZ 0075).
      • 43. Lieutenant Albert Jacka VC of the 14th Australian Battalion (IWM Q 114634).
      • 44. Three 8-inch howitzers support the Allied advance from Fricourt (Library of Congress).
      • 45. British troops repair the road leading from Montauban to Guillemont (IWM Q 4250).
      • 46. Mouquet Farm before it was destroyed (AWM J 00181).
      • 47. The site where Mouquet Farm had once stood before it was destroyed by gunfire (IWM E(AUS) 5).
      • 48. Australian journalist Charles Bean standing between Duncan and Arthur Maxwell. Bean’s cousin Angus Butler is on the right (AWM E 02277).
      • 49. Lieutenant Leo Butler, another of Charles Bean’s cousins (AWM H 05690).
      • 50. Alec Raws and his brother Goldy, who were both killed.
      • 51. Dead Germans, following the British capture of Guillemont on 3 September 1916 (IWM Q 4256).
      • 52. British soldiers occupy a trench in the captured village of Ginchy (IWM Q 4338).
      • 53. New Zealand reinforcements march through Wellington: this is where their big adventure started.
      • 54. New Zealanders from an Auckland battalion in the German Switch Trench following its capture on 15 September 1916 (IWM Q 194).
      • 55. British soldiers congregating round a disabled tank after the fighting west of Flers on 15 September 1916 (IWM Q 5577).
      • 56. A Canadian soldier stands on top of the Sugar Factory south of Courcelette (George Metcalfe Archival Collection, Canadian War Memorial).
      • 57. Canadian wounded en route to a dressing station in the rear (IWM CO 811).
      • 58. Canadians feed their prisoners after Courcelette (George Metcalfe Archival Collection, Canadian War Memorial).
      • 59. King George V pins a Victoria Cross on to Captain Archie White’s jacket (Green Howards Regimental Museum, Richmond, North Yorkshire).
      • 60. New Zealander Private Howard Kippenberger of the 1st Canterbury Regiment.
      • 61. 2nd Lieutenant Alexander Aitken led the New Zealand 1st Otago Battalion into battle on 27 September 1916.
      • 62. Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Freyberg VC.
      • 63. Men from the Middlesex Regiment tramping through the mud as they leave the Somme (IWM Q 1462).
      • 64. A sodden grave amidst the mud at Thiepval symbolizes the awful terrain at the end of the battle (IWM Q 1540).
      • 65. One of the last structures left standing at Beaumont Hamel: the remains of its railway station (IWM Q 4525).
  • ** Maps
    • 1. The Western Front, 1 July 2016.
    • 2. Somme: Objectives and Situation at Night, 1 July 1916.
    • 3. Gommecourt, 1 July 1916.
    • 4. Serre, Heidenkopf and Beaumont Hamel, 1 July 1916.
    • 5. Thiepval and Schwaben Redoubt, 1 July 1916.
    • 6. Ovillers and La Boisselle, 1 July 1916.
    • 7. Fricourt and Mametz, 1 July 1916.
    • 8. Montauban, 1 July 1916.
    • 9. The French, 1 July 1916.
    • 10. Mametz Wood, 7 July 1916.
    • 11. The Dawn Attack, 14 July 1916.
    • 12. Delville Wood, 15 July 1916.
    • 13. Fromelles, 19–20 July 1916.
    • 14. Pozières, 23 July 1916.
    • 15. Guillemont, 30 July 1916.
    • 16. Mouquet Farm and Fabeck Graben, 21 August 1916.
    • 17. The Great Tank Attack, 15 September 1916.
    • 18. North and North-East of Flers and South of Gueudecourt, 25–29 September 1916.
    • 19. Thiepval, 26–29 September 1916.
    • 20. Beaucourt, Beaumont Hamel and the Ancre, 13–19 November 1916.
    • 21. The End of the Battle, 19 November 1916.

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