Cover: Democracy’s Detectives: The Economics of Investigative Journalism, from Harvard University PressCover: Democracy’s Detectives in HARDCOVER

Democracy’s Detectives

The Economics of Investigative Journalism

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$36.00 • £28.95 • €32.50

ISBN 9780674545502

Publication Date: 10/10/2016

Text

384 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

2 line illustrations, 38 tables

World

  • List of Tables*
  • Introduction
  • 1. Economic Theories of Investigative Reporting
  • 2. Detectives, Muckrakers, and Watchdogs
  • 3. What’s the Story?
  • 4. What’s the Impact?
  • 5. How Is It Produced?
  • 6. How Is It Supported?
  • 7. A Single Investigative Reporter
  • 8. Accountability and Algorithms
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Tables
    • 2.1. Principal-agent indices for newspaper content, by decade, 1870–1979
    • 2.2. Ranking of principal-agent indices, within decades, 1870–1979
    • 2.3. Circulation of McClure’s Magazine by population size and region, 1917
    • 2.4. Distribution of journalism award citations across news outlets, 1918–2013
    • 2.5. Production of journalism cited in awards, 1990–2013
    • 2.6. Age and Pulitzer Prizes, 1918–2012
    • 2.7. Media as sources of information in congressional hearings, 1946–2010
    • 2.8. Product differentiation in network evening news, 1989–2012
    • 3.1. Top story topics among IRE contest entries
    • 3.2. IRE contest entries by entry type, medium, medium size, and decade
    • 3.3. Policy agenda area coverage, 1980–2009, IRE contest entries vs. policy venues
    • 3.4. Percentage of IRE contest entries within policy agenda area and focus, by medium
    • 3.5. Policy agenda area and findings of IRE contest entries, by medium size, 1994–2010
    • 4.1. Impacts of IRE contest entries, by medium
    • 4.2. Impacts of IRE contest entries, by story finding
    • 4.3. Impacts of ProPublica investigations, 2010–2012
    • 4.4. Assessing the benefits and costs of investigative journalism: publishing, consuming, and policy impacts
    • 4.5. Costs and benefits of investigative series, for first year of policy change
    • 5.1. Production characteristics of IRE contest entries by medium
    • 5.2. Production characteristics of IRE contest entries, by findings and impacts
    • 5.3. Percentage of tip sheet author affiliations by organization type, by time period
    • 5.4. Organizations with twenty or more IRE tip sheet author affiliations, 1987–2011
    • 5.5. Timing and target of FOIA requests by type of media outlet, 2005–2010
    • 5.6. Characteristics of FOIA requests by organizations with twenty or more requests, 2005–2010
    • 6.1. News outlets and programs with fifty or more submissions to IRE contests
    • 6.2. Change in IRE contest entries, 2006–2007 versus 2008–2009
    • 6.3. Newspaper characteristics by IRE entry history
    • 6.4. Newspaper characteristics by company ownership
    • 6.5. Topics covered in IRE book list by authors associated with newspapers and magazines
    • 6.6. Nonprofit donors and federal political contributions
    • 6.7. 2012 election campaign contributions to Barack Obama and Mitt Romney by nonprofit media donors
    • 7.1. Principal-agent problems in Change versus Dinger stories reported by Pat Stith
    • 7.2. Organizations in North Carolina investigated, and time period of, Change versus Dinger stories reported by Pat Stith
    • 7.3. Frequency distribution of types and impacts of Pat Stith stories
    • 7.4. Relationship between principal-agent problems and impacts for stories by Pat Stith
    • 7.5. Impacts on specific individuals generated by reporting of Pat Stith
    • 7.6. Funds shifted or values affected because of reporting by Pat Stith
    • 7.7. Laws in North Carolina generated by reporting of Pat Stith
    • 7.8. Reactions to “North Carolina Water: Safe to Drink?”
    • 7.9. Selected Pat Stith interview questions with Terry Pierce, director, Division of Environmental Health, NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), February 7, 2006

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