Cover: Marxism and the Philosophy of Language in PAPERBACK

Marxism and the Philosophy of Language

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$34.50 • £27.95 • €31.00

ISBN 9780674550988

Publication Date: 07/21/1986

Short

224 pages

5-3/4 x 8-7/8 inches

World

  • Translators’ Preface, 1986
  • Author’s Introduction, 1929
  • Guide to Translation
  • Translators’ Introduction
  • I. The Philosophy of Language and Its Significance for Marxism
    • 1. The Study of Ideologies and Philosophy of Language
    • 2. Concerning the Relation of the Basis and Superstructures
    • 3. Philosophy of Language and Objective Psychology
  • II. Toward a Marxist Philosophy of Language
    • 1. Two Trends of Thought in Philosophy of Language
    • 2. Language, Speech, and Utterance
    • 3. Verbal Interaction
    • 4. Theme and Meaning in Language
  • III. Toward a History of Forms of Utterance in Language Constructors (Study in the Application of the Sociological Method to Problems of Syntax)
    • 1. Theory of Utterance and the Problems of Syntax
    • 2. Exposition of the Problems of Reported Speech
    • 3. Indirect Discourse, Direct Discourse, and Their Modification
    • 4. Quasi-Direct Discourse in French, German, and Russian
  • Appendix 1. On the First Russian Prolegomena to Semiotics [Ladislav Matejka]
  • Appendix 2. The Formal Method and the Sociological Method: M. M. Baxtin, P. N. Medvedev, (V. N. Vološinov) in Russian Theory and Study of Literature [I. R. Titunik]
  • Index

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