Cover: Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts, from Harvard University PressCover: Mimesis as Make-Believe in PAPERBACK

Mimesis as Make-Believe

On the Foundations of the Representational Arts

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$48.50 • £38.95 • €43.50

ISBN 9780674576032

Publication Date: 10/15/1993

Short

480 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

27 halftones, 3 line illustrations, 2 tables

World

Related Subjects

  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • I. Representations
    • 1. Representation and Make-Believe
      • 1. Imagining
      • 2. Prompters
      • 3. Objects of Imaginings
      • 4. Imagining about Oneself
      • 5. Props and Fictional Truths
      • 6. Fictionality without Props: Dreams and Daydreams
      • 7. Representations
      • 8. Nonfigurative Art
      • 9. Fictional Worlds
      • 10. The Magic of Make-Believe
    • 2. Fiction and Nonfiction
      • 1. Nonfiction
      • 2. Fiction versus Reality
      • 3. Linguistic Strategies
      • 4. Fiction and Assertion
      • 5. Pretended and Represented Illocutionary Actions
      • 6. Fiction Making as an Illocutionary Action?
      • 7. Mixtures, Intermediates, Ambiguity, Indeterminacy
      • 8. Legends and Myths
      • 9. A Note on Truth and Reality
      • 10. Two Kinds of Symbols?
    • 3. Objects of Representation
      • 1. What Objects Are
      • 2. Representation and Matching
      • 3. Determinants
      • 4. Representing and Referring
      • 5. Uses of Objects
      • 6. Reflexive Representation
      • 7. The Inessentiality of Objects
      • 8. Nonactual Objects?
    • 4. The Mechanics of Generation
      • 1. Principles of Generation
      • 2. Direct and Indirect Generation
      • 3. Principles of Implication
      • 4. The Mechanics of Direct Generation
      • 5. Silly Questions
      • 6. Consequences
  • II. Appreciating Representations
    • 5. Puzzles and Problems
      • 1. Rescuing Heroines
      • 2. Fearing Fictions
      • 3. Fictionality and Other Intentional Properties
    • 6. Participation
      • 1. Participation in Children’s Games
      • 2. Appreciators as Participants
      • 3. Verbal Participation
      • 4. Restrictions on Participation
      • 5. Asides to the Audience
      • 6. Seeing the Unseen
    • 7. Psychological Participation
      • 1. Fearing Fictionally
      • 2. Participating Psychologically
      • 3. Paradoxes of Tragedy
      • 4. Suspense and Surprise
      • 5. The Point of Participation
      • 6. Appreciation without Participation
  • III. Modes and Manners
    • 8. Depictive Representation
      • 1. Depiction Defined
      • 2. Looking at Pictures and Looking at Things
      • 3. Styles of Depiction
      • 4. Realism
      • 5. Cross-Modal Depiction
      • 6. Musical Depictions
      • 7. Points of View (in Depictions)
      • 8. Conclusion
    • 9. Verbal Representations
      • 1. Verbal Depiction
      • 2. Narration
      • 3. Two Kinds of Reliability
      • 4. Nonverbal Narration
      • 5. Absent and Effaced Narrators
      • 6. Storytelling Narrators
      • 7. Mediation
      • 8. Points of View in Narrated Representations
  • IV. Semantics and Ontology
    • 10. Doing without Fictitious Entities
      • 1. The Problem
      • 2. Speaking within and about Fictional Worlds
      • 3. Ordinary Statements
      • 4. Unofficial Games
      • 5. Variations
      • 6. Logical Form
    • 11. Existence
      • 1. Betrayal and Disavowal
      • 2. Claims of Existence and Nonexistence
  • Works Cited
  • Index

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