Cover: Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts, from Harvard University PressCover: Mimesis as Make-Believe in PAPERBACK

Mimesis as Make-Believe

On the Foundations of the Representational Arts

Add to Cart

Product Details

PAPERBACK

$47.00 • £37.95 • €42.50

ISBN 9780674576032

Publication Date: 10/15/1993

Short

480 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

27 halftones, 3 line illustrations, 2 tables

World

Related Subjects

  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • I. Representations
    • 1. Representation and Make-Believe
      • 1. Imagining
      • 2. Prompters
      • 3. Objects of Imaginings
      • 4. Imagining about Oneself
      • 5. Props and Fictional Truths
      • 6. Fictionality without Props: Dreams and Daydreams
      • 7. Representations
      • 8. Nonfigurative Art
      • 9. Fictional Worlds
      • 10. The Magic of Make-Believe
    • 2. Fiction and Nonfiction
      • 1. Nonfiction
      • 2. Fiction versus Reality
      • 3. Linguistic Strategies
      • 4. Fiction and Assertion
      • 5. Pretended and Represented Illocutionary Actions
      • 6. Fiction Making as an Illocutionary Action?
      • 7. Mixtures, Intermediates, Ambiguity, Indeterminacy
      • 8. Legends and Myths
      • 9. A Note on Truth and Reality
      • 10. Two Kinds of Symbols?
    • 3. Objects of Representation
      • 1. What Objects Are
      • 2. Representation and Matching
      • 3. Determinants
      • 4. Representing and Referring
      • 5. Uses of Objects
      • 6. Reflexive Representation
      • 7. The Inessentiality of Objects
      • 8. Nonactual Objects?
    • 4. The Mechanics of Generation
      • 1. Principles of Generation
      • 2. Direct and Indirect Generation
      • 3. Principles of Implication
      • 4. The Mechanics of Direct Generation
      • 5. Silly Questions
      • 6. Consequences
  • II. Appreciating Representations
    • 5. Puzzles and Problems
      • 1. Rescuing Heroines
      • 2. Fearing Fictions
      • 3. Fictionality and Other Intentional Properties
    • 6. Participation
      • 1. Participation in Children’s Games
      • 2. Appreciators as Participants
      • 3. Verbal Participation
      • 4. Restrictions on Participation
      • 5. Asides to the Audience
      • 6. Seeing the Unseen
    • 7. Psychological Participation
      • 1. Fearing Fictionally
      • 2. Participating Psychologically
      • 3. Paradoxes of Tragedy
      • 4. Suspense and Surprise
      • 5. The Point of Participation
      • 6. Appreciation without Participation
  • III. Modes and Manners
    • 8. Depictive Representation
      • 1. Depiction Defined
      • 2. Looking at Pictures and Looking at Things
      • 3. Styles of Depiction
      • 4. Realism
      • 5. Cross-Modal Depiction
      • 6. Musical Depictions
      • 7. Points of View (in Depictions)
      • 8. Conclusion
    • 9. Verbal Representations
      • 1. Verbal Depiction
      • 2. Narration
      • 3. Two Kinds of Reliability
      • 4. Nonverbal Narration
      • 5. Absent and Effaced Narrators
      • 6. Storytelling Narrators
      • 7. Mediation
      • 8. Points of View in Narrated Representations
  • IV. Semantics and Ontology
    • 10. Doing without Fictitious Entities
      • 1. The Problem
      • 2. Speaking within and about Fictional Worlds
      • 3. Ordinary Statements
      • 4. Unofficial Games
      • 5. Variations
      • 6. Logical Form
    • 11. Existence
      • 1. Betrayal and Disavowal
      • 2. Claims of Existence and Nonexistence
  • Works Cited
  • Index

Recent News

From Our Blog

Jacket, Author Unknown: The Power of Anonymity in Ancient Rome, by Tom Geue, from Harvard University Press

Who Needs an Author?

In his new book Author Unknown: The Power of Anonymity in Ancient Rome, classicist Tom Geue asks us to work with anonymity rather than against it and to appreciate the continuing power of anonymity in our own time. Here, he discusses the history—and strength—of anonymous works of literature. Back in the roaring ’20s, I. A. Richar

‘manifold glories of classical Greek and Latin’

The digital Loeb Classical Library (loebclassics.com) extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature.