Cover: Charles V. Chapin and the Public Health Movement, from Harvard University PressCover: Charles V. Chapin and the Public Health Movement in E-DITION

Charles V. Chapin and the Public Health Movement

Available from De Gruyter »

Product Details

E-DITION

$65.00 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674598829

Publication Date: 01/01/1962

310 pages

World

Related Subjects

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Charles V. Chapin—pioneer in public health—won international as well as local reputation for his fundamental contributions to sanitation, the control of communicable disease, public health administration, epidemiology, and the collection and use of vital statistics. His reports and his great book, The Sources and Modes of Infection, are classics in the field. This first full biography is also a history of the public health movement in Europe and the United States—peopled with such figures as William H. Welch, Theodore Roosevelt, Sir Arthur Newsholme, and Karl Pearson—and of the major social problems created by urbanism, immigration, and industrialization.

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Jacket: The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, from Harvard University Press

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While technology used in policing has improved, it hasn’t progressed, says Khalil Gibran Muhammad, if racial biases are built into those new technologies. This excerpt from his book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, shows that for the reform called for by the current protests against systemic racism and racially-biased policing to be fulfilled, the police—especially those at the top—will need to change their pre-programmed views on race and the way they see the Black citizens they are supposed to “serve and protect.”