HARVARD ORIENTAL SERIES
Cover: Nepalese Shaman Oral Texts, I in HARDCOVER

Harvard Oriental Series 55

Nepalese Shaman Oral Texts, I

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$94.50 • £75.95 • €85.00

ISBN 9780674607958

Publication Date: 07/01/1999

Short

Nepalese Shaman Oral Texts is a bilingual (Nepali and English) critical edition of three complete, representative repertoires of shaman texts collected over the past twenty years in Jajarkot District, Western Nepal. Throughout that area, shamans continue to fulfill important therapeutic roles, diagnosing problems, treating afflictions, and restoring order and balance to the lives of their clients and their communities. Each of these efforts incorporates extensive, meticulously memorized oral texts, materials that not only clarify symptoms and causes but also detail the proper ways to conduct rituals. These texts preserve the knowledge necessary to act as a shaman, and confirm a social world that demands continuous intervention by shamans.

This volume, the first of its kind, includes both publicly chanted recitals and privately whispered spells of the area’s three leading shamans, annotated with extensive notes. Containing over 250 texts, this work endeavors to provide a comprehensive documentation of a non-Western healing system through the material that sustains and preserves that tradition, demonstrating that shaman texts remain thoroughly meaningful.

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