Cover: Nerve Cells and Insect Behavior in PAPERBACK

Nerve Cells and Insect Behavior

With an Appreciation by John G. Hildebrand, Revised edition

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$35.50 • £28.95 • €32.00

ISBN 9780674608016

Publication Date: 03/15/1998

Short

256 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

63 halftones and line illustrations

World

How do nerve impulses that are generated by an insect’s sensory cells determine its behaviour? Answers to this question had begun to emerge in the 1960s, when Kenneth Roeder wrote this short but insightful book. The volume consists of a series of self-contained essays which build an awesome account of how insects sense the world...The publication of this book was recognised as a landmark event 35 years ago. Its great depth of insight, explanatory power and unique charm ensure that it will continue to appeal to non-specialists and inspire researchers for many more years. A true classic.—Glen Powell, Antenna [UK]

Praise for the first edition:
Some of us have been lucky enough to be in a laboratory during a period when we felt, nay, when we knew, that a secret of Nature was being unraveled, that new relationships were being discovered and understood. There is an electric tension in the air, an exhilaration...and we become impatient with our own limitations of energy. That is ’contagious excitement,’ and it can be found in this little book.—Teru Hayashi, Science

Roeder’s surpassing work is the little volume you hold in your hands. Nerve Cells and Insect Behavior ...is a very personal exploration of insect neuroethology. It is a collection of first-hand accounts of trailblazing experimental investigations of the neural mechanisms underlying specific behaviors of insects. Roeder tells these stories in a clear, lively, and engaging style, and the timeless impact of this book can be profound.—From the new Appreciation by John G. Hildebrand

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