Cover: Oakes Ames in HARDCOVER

Oakes Ames

Jottings of a Harvard Botanist

Edited by Pauline Ames Plimpton

Foreword by George Plimpton

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$13.50 • £10.95 • €12.00

ISBN 9780674629219

Publication Date: 02/06/1980

Short

World

Collected and edited by Pauline Ames Plimpton, his daughter, and with a Foreword by George Plimpton, his grandson, these journals, letters, and diaries, written in the first half of the century, give a vivid autobiographic picture of the era. Oakes Ames was one of the group of extraordinary teachers that Harvard drew to its faculty under Eliot and Lowell; he devoted his life to the study and teaching of botany and became a world authority on orchids and economic botany, directing the Botanical Museum and the Arnold Arboretum. The book gives a description of family life in Boston and the small town of North Easton, Massachusetts, as well as the experiences of travel in those early days. The main theme is his love of nature, whether in collecting orchids or acquiring land for his home. It is a book to be savored by those interested in the University, in orchidology and in the striking contrasts between the past and the present. His austerity of character and his subtle, surprising humor and insights are particularly relevant for the present time.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene