REVEALING ANTIQUITY
Cover: The Orientalizing Revolution: Near Eastern Influence on Greek Culture in the Early Archaic Age, from Harvard University PressCover: The Orientalizing Revolution in PAPERBACK

Revealing Antiquity 5

The Orientalizing Revolution

Near Eastern Influence on Greek Culture in the Early Archaic Age

Add to Cart

Product Details

PAPERBACK

$34.50 • £27.95 • €31.00

ISBN 9780674643642

Publication Date: 08/11/1998

Academic Trade

238 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

5 halftones, 3 line illustration, 1 map

Revealing Antiquity

World

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • 1. “Who Are Public Workers”: The Migrant Craftsmen
    • Historical Background
    • Oriental Products in Greece
    • Writing and Literature in the Eighth Century
    • The Problem of Loan-Words
  • 2. “A Seer or a Healer”: Magic and Medicine
    • “Craftsmen of the Sacred”: Mobility and Family Structure
    • Hepatoscopy
    • Foundation Deposits
    • Purification
    • Spirits of the Dead and Black Magic
    • Substitute Sacrifice
    • Asclepius and Asgelatas
    • Ecstatic Divination
    • Lamashtu, Lamia, and Gorgo
  • 3. “Or Also a Godly Singer”: Akkadian and Early Greek Literature
    • From Atrahasis to the “Deception of Zeus”
    • Complaint in Heaven: Ishtar and Aphrodite
    • The Overpopulated Earth
    • Seven against Thebes
    • Common Style and Stance in Oriental and Greek Epic
    • Fables
    • Magic and Cosmogony
  • Conclusion
  • Abbreviations
  • Bibliography
  • Notes
  • Index of Greek Words
  • General Index

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket, Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter, by Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, from Harvard University Press

Technology, Biology, Chronology

Fears and anxieties about the latest technologies are nothing new, say Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, authors of Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter. But neither is the fact that they often provide new ways for us to connect and socialize. Mark Twain is rumored to have said “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” Of late, much press has been spent on uncovering those rhymes, focusing on the similarities between the current epidemic and past ones. These stories underscore the lesson that progress hasn't allowed us to escape the suffering of earlier