Cover: Orientations: Collected Writings, from Harvard University PressCover: Orientations in PAPERBACK

Orientations

Collected Writings

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$50.00 • £40.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780674643765

Publication Date: 03/01/1990

Short

541 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

90 figures

North America only

  • Translator’s Note [Martin Cooper]
  • On Reading Boulez [Jean-Jacques Nattiez]
  • I. The Shaping Imagination
    • Fundamentals
      • 1. Aesthetics and the Fetishists
      • 2. Taste: ‘The Spectacles Worn by Reason’?
      • 3. Putting the Phantoms to Flight
      • 4. Time, Notation and Coding
      • 5. Form
      • 6. Towards a Conclusion
      • 7. Periform
    • Seeing and Knowing
      • 8. The Composer as Critic
      • 9. Demythologizing the Conductor
      • 10. On Musical Analysis
      • 11. The Teacher’s Task
    • Frenzy and Organization
      • 12. The System Exposed: Polyphonie X and Structures for two pianos
      • 13. ‘Sonate, que me veux-tu’: Third Piano Sonata
      • 14. Constructing an Improvisation: Deuxiéme Improvisation sur Mallarmé
      • 15. Pli selon pli
      • 16. Sound, Word, Synthesis
      • 17. Poetry—Centre and Absence—Music
      • 18. An Interview with Dominique Jameux: Polyphonie X, Structures for two pianos and Poésie pour pouvoir
  • II. Exemplars
      • 19. Beethoven: Tell Me
      • 20. Berlioz and the Realm of the Imaginary
      • 21. Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique and Lélio
      • 22. Richard Wagner: The Man and the Works
      • 23. Cosima Wagner’s Diary: ‘R. is Working’
      • 24. Parsifal: The First Encounter
      • 25. Wieland Wagner: ‘Here Space Becomes Time’
      • 26. Approaches to Parsifal
      • 27. The Ring
        • Time Re-explored
        • A Performer’s Notebook
      • 28. Gustav Mahler: Why Biography?
      • 29. Mahler: Our Contemporary
      • 30. Mahler: Das klagende Lied
      • 31. Reflections on Pelléas et Mélisande
      • 32. Debussy: Orchestral Works
      • 33. Satie: Chien flasque
      • 34. Schoenberg the Unloved?
      • 35. Speaking, Playing, Singing: Pierrot lunaire and Le Marteau sans maître
      • 36. Kandinsky and Schoenberg
      • 37. Bartók: Music for strings, percussion and celesta
      • 38. Stravinsky: Style or Idea?—In Praise of Amnesia
      • 39. Stravinsky: The Firebird
      • 40. Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring
      • 41. The Stravinsky–Webern Conjunction
      • 42. Varèse: Hyperprisme, Octandre, Intégrales
      • 43. Berg: The Chamber Concerto
      • 44. Wozzeck and its Interpretation
      • 45. Lulu
        • The Second Opera
        • Questions of Interpretation
        • A Short Postscript on Fidelity
      • 46. Olivier Messiaen
        • A Class and its Fantasies
        • In Retrospect
        • Vision and Revolution
        • The Utopian Years
        • The Power of Example
      • 47. Oriental Music: A Lost Paradise?
  • III. Looking Back
    • The ‘Domaine muscial’
      • 48. First and Second Hearings
      • 49. Experiment, Ostriches and Music
      • 50. Mini-Editorial
      • 51. Ten Years On
    • Point of Departure
      • 52. Why I Say ‘No’ to Malraux
    • Composer and Audience
      • 53. Where Are We Now?
      • 54. The Bauhaus Model
      • 55. Orchestras, Concert Hall, Repertory, Audiences
      • 56. Arousing Interest in New Music
      • 57. What’s New?
      • 58. Freeing Music
      • 59. Technology and the Composer
    • Tributes
      • 60. Wolfgang Steinecke
        • Accidental
        • From the distance
      • 61. Edgard Varèse
      • 62. Hermann Scherchen: the Adventurous Patriarch
      • 63. Roger Désormière: ‘I Hate Remembering’
      • 64. Hans Rosbaud
        • The Conductor and his Model
        • ‘…to cut me off before night’
      • 65. T. W. Adorno
      • 66. Heinrich Strobel
        • The Friend
        • The Intermediary
      • 67. Brudno Maderna: A Portrait Sketch
  • By Way of Conclusion
      • 68. The Elliptical Geometry of Utopia
  • Index

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