HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Translation’s Forgotten History: Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation, and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature, from Harvard University PressCover: Translation’s Forgotten History in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 394

Translation’s Forgotten History

Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation, and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$39.95 • £31.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674660045

Publication Date: 03/28/2016

Text

Translation’s Forgotten History investigates the meanings and functions that translation generated for modern national literatures during their formative period and reconsiders literature as part of a dynamic translational process of negotiating foreign values. By examining the triadic literary and cultural relations among Russia, Japan, and colonial Korea and revealing a shared sensibility and literary experience in East Asia (which referred to Russia as a significant other in the formation of its own modern literatures), this book highlights translation as a radical and ineradicable part—not merely a catalyst or complement—of the formation of modern national literature. Translation’s Forgotten History thus rethinks the way modern literature developed in Korea and East Asia. While national canons are founded on amnesia regarding their process of formation, framing literature from the beginning as a process rather than an entity allows a more complex and accurate understanding of national literature formation in East Asia and may also provide a model for world literature today.

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