Cover: Informed Power: Communication in the Early American South, from Harvard University PressCover: Informed Power in HARDCOVER

Informed Power

Communication in the Early American South

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$42.00 • £33.95 • €38.00

ISBN 9780674660182

Publication Date: 04/04/2016

Text

304 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

11 halftones, 4 maps

World

  • List of Illustrations*
  • Map: The Early South
  • Introduction
  • I. What: Making Sense of La Florida, 1560s–1670s
    • 1. Paths and Power
    • 2. Information Contests
    • 3. Rebellious News
  • II. Who: The Many Faces of Information, 1660s–1710s
    • 4. Informers and Slaves
    • 5. The Information Race
  • III. How: New Ways of Articulating Power, 1710–1740
    • 6. Networks in Wartime
    • 7. Dissonant Connections
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Illustrations
    • Figures
      • 1.1 Pre-Columbian rock map
      • 1.2 Detail from a Creek dictionary
      • 1.3 A Catawba map
      • 1.4 Timucua council meeting
      • 2.1 Outina attacks Potano
      • 3.1 Spanish information networks, 1656
      • 3.2 Timucua information networks, 1656
      • 4.1 Indian slave raids
      • 6.1 Sanute warns of coming war
      • 6.2 Yamasee and Apalachicola relocation
      • 7.1 Oglethorpe’s attack on San Agustín
    • Maps
      • The early South
      • 1.1 Major paths and towns, circa 1720
      • 3.1 Timucua missions, 1650s
      • 5.1 Apalachicola towns, 1680s

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