Cover: Sea of the Caliphs: The Mediterranean in the Medieval Islamic World, from Harvard University PressCover: Sea of the Caliphs in HARDCOVER

Sea of the Caliphs

The Mediterranean in the Medieval Islamic World

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$37.00 • £29.95 • €33.50

ISBN 9780674660465

Publication Date: 01/21/2018

Academic Trade

416 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

2 halftones, 8 maps

Belknap Press

World

  • Introduction: The End of the Moorish and Saracen Pirate?
  • Part I: The Arab Mediterranean between Representation and Appropriation
    • 1. The Arab Discovery of the Mediterranean
    • 2. Arab Writing on the Conquest of the Mediterranean
    • 3. The Silences of the Sea: The Abbasid Jihad
    • 4. The Geographers’ Mediterranean
    • 5. Muslim Centers of the Western Mediterranean: Islam without the Abbasids
    • 6. The Mediterranean of the Western Caliphs
    • 7. The Western Mediterranean: Last Bastion of Islam’s Maritime Ambitions
  • Part II: Mediterranean Strategies of the Caliphs
    • 8. The Mediterranean of the Two Empires
    • 9. Controlling the Mediterranean: The Abbasid Model
    • 10. The Maritime Awakening of the Muslim West
    • 11. The Maritime Imperialism of the Caliphs in the Tenth Century: The End of Jihad?
    • 12. Islam’s Maritime Sovereignty in the Face of Latin Expansion
  • Conclusion: The Medieval Mediterranean and Islamic Memory
  • Notes
  • Glossary
  • Chronologies
  • Selected Bibliography
  • Index

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