HARVARD-YENCHING INSTITUTE MONOGRAPH SERIES
Cover: Powerful Relations in HARDCOVER

Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series 43

Powerful Relations

Kinship, Status, and the State in Sung China (960-1279)

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$47.50 • £38.95 • €43.00

ISBN 9780674695924

Publication Date: 04/20/1998

Short

384 pages

6 x 9 inches

8 line drawings, 1 map, 1 table

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series

World

The realignment of the Chinese social order that took place over the course of the Sung dynasty set the pattern for Chinese society throughout most of the later imperial era. This study examines that realignment from the perspective of specific Sung families, using data on two groups of Sung elites--the grand councilors who led the bureaucracy and locally prominent gentlemen in Wu-chou (in modern Chekiang).

By analyzing kinship relationships, Beverly Bossler demonstrates the importance of family relations to the establishment and perpetuation of social status locally and in the capital. She shows how social position was measured and acted upon, how status shaped personal relationships (and vice versa), and how both status and personal relationships conditioned—and were conditioned by—political success. Finally, in a contribution to the ongoing discussion of localism in the Sung, Bossler details the varied networks that connected the local elite to the capital and elsewhere.

Awards & Accolades

  • A Choice Outstanding Academic Title of 1998
Why We Act: Turning Bystanders into Moral Rebels, by Catherine A. Sanderson, from Harvard University Press

From Our Blog

Jacket: The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, from Harvard University Press

“Predictive Policing” and Racial Profiling

While technology used in policing has improved, it hasn’t progressed, says Khalil Gibran Muhammad, if racial biases are built into those new technologies. This excerpt from his book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, shows that for the reform called for by the current protests against systemic racism and racially-biased policing to be fulfilled, the police—especially those at the top—will need to change their pre-programmed views on race and the way they see the Black citizens they are supposed to “serve and protect.”