Cover: Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China, from Harvard University PressCover: Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China in HARDCOVER

Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$53.50 • £42.95 • €48.00

ISBN 9780674724952

Publication Date: 11/01/2013

Short

416 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

2 halftones, 20 line illustrations, 2 maps, 14 tables

World

  • Conventions
  • Introduction
  • Part I: Becoming Mainstream: “Way Learning” during the Late Empire
    • 1. Ming Imperial Power, Cultural Politics, and Civil Examinations
    • 2. Ming to Qing: “Way Learning” Standards and the 8-Legged Essay
  • Part II: Unintended Consequences of Civil Examinations
    • 3. Circulation of Ming-Qing Elites
    • 4. Classical Literacy in Late Imperial China
    • 5. Anxiety, Dreams, and the Examination Life
  • Part III: Retooling Civil Examinations to Suit Changing Times
    • 6. Limits of Dynastic Power
    • 7. From Ming to Qing Policy Questions
    • 8. Curricular Reform: From Qing to the Taipings
  • Appendixes
    • 1. Dates of Chinese Dynasties
    • 2. Emperors of the Great Ming (1368–1644)
    • 3. Emperors of the Great Qing (1644–1911)
  • Abbreviations
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, by Julie Sedivy, from Harvard University Press

Lost in Translation: Reclaiming Lost Language

In Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, Julie Sedivy sets out to understand the science of language loss and the potential for renewal. Sedivy takes on the psychological and social world of multilingualism, exploring the human brain’s capacity to learn—and forget—languages at various stages of life. She argues that the struggle to remain connected to an ancestral language and culture is a site of common ground: people from all backgrounds can recognize the crucial role of language in forming a sense of self.