I TATTI STUDIES IN ITALIAN RENAISSANCE HISTORY
Cover: The Medicean Succession: Monarchy and Sacral Politics in Duke Cosimo dei Medici’s Florence, from Harvard University PressCover: The Medicean Succession in HARDCOVER

The Medicean Succession

Monarchy and Sacral Politics in Duke Cosimo dei Medici’s Florence

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$57.00 • £45.95 • €51.50

ISBN 9780674725478

Publication Date: 03/10/2014

Text

360 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

1 halftone, 6 graphs

I Tatti Studies in Italian Renaissance History

World

  • List of Figures*
  • Prologue: The Scene
  • Introduction
  • 1. The Familiarity of Terrestrial Divinity
  • 2. Divine Right Rule and the Providential Worldview
  • 3. Rescuing Virtue from Machiavelli
  • 4. Prince or Patrone? Cosimo as Ecclesiastical Patron
  • 5. Cosimo and Savonarolan Reform
  • 6. Defense of the Sacred
  • Conclusion
  • Appendix: Glossary of Names
  • Sources and Abbreviations
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Figures
    • 1.1 Giorgio Vasari, The Apotheosis of Cosimo
    • 6.1 Provenance of priests elected to benefices by communities, 1546–1550
    • 6.2 Provenance of priests elected to benefices by the ordinary, 1546–1550
    • 6.3 Provenance of priests elected to benefices by Rome, 1546–1550
    • 6.4 Percentage of testators demonstrating belief in Purgatory
    • 6.5 Percentage of testators using Catholic identifiers
    • 6.6 Comparison of nobles and nonnobles requesting masses

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