Cover: Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China, from Harvard University PressCover: Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China in PAPERBACK

Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China

Ezra F. Vogel is the author of numerous books on Japan and China, including Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China (Harvard), which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography, winner of the Lionel Gelber Prize, and a Best Book of the Year in The Economist, Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. It was also a New York Times Editors’ Choice and a Gates Notes Top Read. Vogel is the author of the classic work Japan as Number One (Harvard), whose Japanese edition topped the bestseller list there for many years. He is Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, Emeritus, at Harvard University.

Awards & Accolades

  • Honorable Mention, 2011 Association of American Publishers PROSE Award, European & World History Category
  • An Esquire China Book of the Year, 2012
  • An Economist Best Book of 2011
  • A Financial Times Best Book of 2011
  • A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice, 2011
  • A Wall Street Journal Book of the Year, 2011
  • A Washington Post Best Book of 2011
Racism in America: A Reader, edited by Harvard University Press, with a Foreword by Annette Gordon-Reed, available for free download in PDF, EPUB, and Kindle

From Our Blog

Jacket: The Coming Good Society: Why New Realities Demand New Rights, by William F. Schulz and Sushma Raman, from Harvard University Press

Q&A with William F. Schulz and Sushma Raman, authors of The Coming Good Society: Why New Realities Demand New Rights

As times change so must we as a society, and that includes our conception of rights, say William F. Schulz and Sushma Raman, whose new book, The Coming Good Society: Why New Realities Demand New Rights, came out just as Black Lives Matter protesters filled the streets this summer. We spoke with them about the current view—and the future—of human rights. How do you understand the purpose of rights? What function do they serve in a society?