Cover: After Beethoven: The Imperative of Originality in the Symphony, from Harvard University PressCover: After Beethoven in E-DITION

After Beethoven

The Imperative of Originality in the Symphony

Available from De Gruyter »

Product Details

E-DITION

$65.00 • £54.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674733398

Publication Date: 01/01/1997

212 pages

musical illustrations

World

Harvard University Press has partnered with De Gruyter to make available for sale worldwide virtually all in-copyright HUP books that had become unavailable since their original publication. The 2,800 titles in the “e-ditions” program can be purchased individually as PDF eBooks or as hardcover reprint (“print-on-demand”) editions via the “Available from De Gruyter” link above. They are also available to institutions in ten separate subject-area packages that reflect the entire spectrum of the Press’s catalog. More about the E-ditions Program »

Beethoven cast a looming shadow over the nineteenth century. For composers he was a model both to emulate and to overcome. “You have no idea how it feels,” Brahms confided, “when one always hears such a giant marching behind one.” Exploring the response of five composers—Berlioz, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, and Mahler—to what each clearly saw as the challenge of Beethoven’s symphonies, Mark Evan Bonds richly enhances our understanding of the evolution of the symphony and Beethoven’s legacy.

Overt borrowings from Beethoven—for example, the lyrical theme in the Finale of Brahms’ First Symphony, so like the “Ode to Joy” theme in Beethoven’s Ninth—have often been the subject of criticism. Bonds now shows us how composers imitate or allude to a Beethoven theme or compositional strategy precisely in order to turn away from it, creating a new musical solution. Berlioz’s Harold en Italie, Mendelssohn’s Lobgesang, Schumann’s Fourth Symphony, Brahms’ First, and Mahler’s Fourth serve as illuminating examples. Discussion focuses on such core issues as Beethoven’s innovations in formal design, the role of text and voice, fusion of diverse genres, cyclical coherence of movements, and the function of the symphonic finale.

Bonds lucidly argues that the great symphonists of the nineteenth century cleared creative space for themselves by both confronting and deviating from the practices of their potentially overpowering precursor. His analysis places familiar masterpieces in a new light.

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Jacket: Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, by James L. Nolan, Jr., from Harvard University Press

Remembering Hiroshima

On this day 75 years ago, the United States dropped the world’s first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. James L. Nolan Jr.’s grandfather was a doctor who participated in the Manhattan Project, and he writes about him in Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, an unflinching examination of the moral and professional dilemmas faced by physicians who took part in the project. Below, please find the introduction to Nolan’s book. On the morning of June 17, 1945, Captain James F. Nolan, MD, boarded a plane