Cover: A Tale of Two Plantations: Slave Life and Labor in Jamaica and Virginia, from Harvard University PressCover: A Tale of Two Plantations in HARDCOVER

A Tale of Two Plantations

Slave Life and Labor in Jamaica and Virginia

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$46.50 • £37.95 • €42.00

ISBN 9780674735361

Publication Date: 11/04/2014

Academic Trade

552 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

9 line illustrations, 31 tables

World

  • Prologue
  • 1. Mesopotamia versus Mount Airy: The Demographic Contrast
  • 2. Sarah Affir and Her Mesopotamia Family
  • 3. Winney Grimshaw and Her Mount Airy Family
  • 4. “Dreadful Idlers” in the Mesopotamia Cane Fields
  • 5. “Doing Their Duty” at Mount Airy
  • 6. The Moravian Christian Community at Mesopotamia
  • 7. The Exodus from Mount Airy to Alabama
  • 8. Mesopotamia versus Mount Airy: The Social Contrast
  • 9. Emancipation
  • Appendixes*
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Appendixes
    • 1. Slave Population Changes at Mesopotamia, 1762–1833
    • 2. Mesopotamia Population Pyramid, 1762
    • 3. Mesopotamia Population Pyramid, 1789
    • 4. Mesopotamia Population Pyramid, 1833
    • 5. Slave Population Changes at Mount Airy, 1809–1863
    • 6. Mount Airy Population Pyramid, 1809
    • 7. Mount Airy Population Pyramid, 1828
    • 8. Mount Airy and Alabama Population Pyramid, 1863
    • 9. Slave Population Changes on Twenty-Seven Westmoreland Sugar Estates, 1807–1834
    • 10. The Workforces on Twenty-Seven Westmoreland Sugar Estates, August 1, 1834
    • 11. Slaveholding in Six Virginia Counties, 1810
    • 12. Sarah Affir’s Mesopotamia Family Tree
    • 13. Winney Grimshaw’s Mount Airy Family Tree
    • 14. Slave Population, Sugar Production, and Crop Value at Mesopotamia, 1751–1832
    • 15. The Primary Occupations of 877 Adult Mesopotamia Slaves, 1762–1833
    • 16. The Occupation, Health, and Longevity of Mesopotamia Adult Slaves, 1762–1833
    • 17. Mesopotamia Adult Field Workers by Gender, 1762–1832
    • 18. Stated Causes of Slave Deaths at Mesopotamia (1762–1832) and at Worthy Park (1792–1838)
    • 19. Recorded Births at Mesopotamia (1774–1833) and at Mount Airy (1809–1863)
    • 20. Motherhood at Mesopotamia in 1802
    • 21. Comparison of 678 Mesopotamia Adults by Gender, Color, and Origin, 1763–1832
    • 22. The Mount Airy Slave Force in 1809
    • 23. Primary Occupations of the 542 Adult Slaves at Mount Airy and the 877 Adult Slaves at Mesopotamia
    • 24. Harvest Teams at Doctor’s Hall and Forkland, Mount Airy, 1816
    • 25. Mount Airy Slaves Sent to Cloverdale Iron Works in 1810
    • 26. Mount Airy Slaves Sold in 1816
    • 27. Moravian Missionaries and Diarists at Mesopotamia
    • 28. Profile of the Mesopotamia Slaves Who Were Baptized, 1761–1769
    • 29. Mount Airy Slaves Sent to Alabama, 1833–1837
    • 30. Mount Airy Slaves Sent to Alabama, 1845
    • 31. Mount Airy Slaves Sent to Alabama, 1854
    • 32. Slave Households at Oakland Plantation, 1859
    • 33. Motherhood among the Mount Airy Women in Virginia and Alabama
    • 34. Mount Airy Slaves Sent to Alabama, December 1861
    • 35. Mount Airy Slaves Sent to Alabama, March 1862
    • 36. Profile of the Mesopotamia Congregation in 1761–1769, 1798–1818, and 1831
    • 37. Slaves Inventoried at Mount Airy, February 1863
    • 38. Field Laborers on August 1, 1834, and on October 29, 1838, at Eighteen Westmoreland Sugar Estates

Biographical information about 430 members of seven multigenerational slave families at Mesopotamia and Mount Airy is digitally displayed on an accompanying website, www.twoplantations.com.

From Our Blog

Jacket: Awakening: How Gays and Lesbians Brought Marriage Equality to America, by Nathaniel Frank, from Harvard University Press

Celebrating Pride Month

To celebrate Pride Month, we are highlighting excerpts from books that explore the lives and experiences of the LGBT+ community. Nathaniel Frank’s Awakening: How Gays and Lesbians Brought Marriage Equality to America tells the dramatic story of the struggle for same-sex couples to legally marry, something that is now taken for granted. Below, he describes the beginnings of the gay rights movement. For homophiles of the 1950s, identifying as gay was almost always a risky and radical act