Cover: Governing Behavior: How Nerve Cell Dictatorships and Democracies Control Everything We Do, from Harvard University PressCover: Governing Behavior in HARDCOVER

Governing Behavior

How Nerve Cell Dictatorships and Democracies Control Everything We Do

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$29.95 • £23.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780674736900

Publication Date: 03/14/2016

Trade

240 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

9 color illustrations, 21 halftones, 18 line illustrations

World

[A] chummy yet dizzying state-of-the-art tour of behavioral neurobiology.—Simon Ings, New Scientist

This book would be incredibly useful for students just embarking on a career in neurophysiology, or for any student of science who is interested in the history of neural thought. It presents the experimental evidence that led to our present-day understanding of many neuroethological concepts such as command neurons, efference copy, neuronal networks, neuronal multifunctionality, the ubiquitous role of inhibition, and others.—Peter Narins, University of California, Los Angeles

Governing Behavior provides an accessible and engaging review of modern theories of neuroethology. Berkowitz presents an account of the experiments behind the theories that is at once clear, concise, scholarly, and entertaining. His overarching analogy between nervous systems and governments works—and helps the reader to grasp the fundamental concepts of autonomy and partnership that characterize neural circuits.—Leslie Tolbert, University of Arizona

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, by Julie Sedivy, from Harvard University Press

Lost in Translation: Reclaiming Lost Language

In Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, Julie Sedivy sets out to understand the science of language loss and the potential for renewal. Sedivy takes on the psychological and social world of multilingualism, exploring the human brain’s capacity to learn—and forget—languages at various stages of life. She argues that the struggle to remain connected to an ancestral language and culture is a site of common ground: people from all backgrounds can recognize the crucial role of language in forming a sense of self.