Cover: Galileo’s Telescope: A European Story, from Harvard University PressCover: Galileo’s Telescope in HARDCOVER

Galileo’s Telescope

A European Story

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674736917

Publication Date: 03/23/2015

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352 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

8 color illustrations, 25 halftones, 5 maps

World

  • List of Illustrations, Plates, and Maps*
  • Prologue
  • 1. From the Low Countries
  • 2. The Venetian Archipelago
  • 3. Breaking News: Glass and Envelopes
  • 4. In a Flash
  • 5. Peregrinations
  • 6. The Battle of Prague
  • 7. Across the English Channel: Poets, Philosophers, and Astronomers
  • 8. Conquering France
  • 9. Milan: At the Court of “King” Federico
  • 10. The Dark Skies of Florence
  • 11. The Roman Mission
  • 12. In Motion: Portugal, India, China
  • Epilogue
  • Notes
  • References
  • Credits
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Illustrations, Plates, and Maps
    • Illustrations
      • 1. Galileo, objective lens, late 1609
      • 2. Galileo, objective lens, late 1609
      • 3–4. Galileo’s telescopes, 1609–1610
      • 5–6. Eyepiece and objective lens, 1609–1610
      • 7. Brueghel the Elder, Landscape with View of the Castle of Mariemont, 1611
      • 8. Brueghel the Elder, Landscape with View of the Castle of Mariemont, 1611, detail
      • 9. Galileo’s shopping list
      • 10. Galileo’s first representation of Jupiter’s satellites
      • 11. Galileo’s sketch of Jupiter’s satellites
      • 12. Galileo, report of observations of Jupiter’s satellites, January 7–15, 1610
      • 13. Galileo, first page of the autograph record of observations of Jupiter’s satellites, 1610
      • 14. Galileo, diagram of the positions of Jupiter’s satellites, April 24 and 25, 1610
      • 15. Galileo, autograph transcription of Kepler’s solution of the anagram of Saturn
      • 16. Galileo, autograph experiments with anagrams
      • 17. Harriot, drawing of the Moon, July 26, 1609
      • 18. Harriot, drawing of the Moon, July 17, 1610
      • 19. Galileo, drawing of the Moon, 1610
      • 20. Chalette, bozzetto for the title page of Astra medicea by Nicolas Fabri de Peiresc
      • 21. Brueghel the Elder, Allegory of Air, 1621
      • 22. Title page with the Medici arms
      • 23. Cigoli, Assumption of the Virgin, 1610–1612, detail
      • 24. Galileo, drawing of the Moon, 1609
      • 25. Dias, Tian Wen Lüe, 1615
    • Plates (color plates follow page 180)
      • 1. Brueghel the Elder, Landscape with View of the Castle of Mariemont, 1611
      • 2. Brueghel the Elder and Rubens, Allegory of Sight, 1617
      • 3. Brueghel the Elder, Allegory of Air, 1621
      • 4. Cigoli, Assumption of the Virgin, 1610–1612, detail
      • 5. de Ribera, Allegory of Sight, ca. 1614
      • 6. Galileo, drawings of the Moon, 1609, detail
      • 7. Cassini, drawing of the Moon, 1671–1679
      • 8. English school, Royal Observatory from Crooms Hill, ca. 1690
    • Maps
      • 1. Circulation of the Dutch spyglass: September 1608–August 1609
      • 2. Publication of the Sidereus nuncius: spread of the news of the publication and circulation of the copies, from March 13 to April 30, 1610
      • 3. Prague, March 31, 1610–January 1, 1611: circulation of Galileo’s Sidereus nuncius and telescope
      • 4. Where Galileo stayed in Rome: March–June 1611
      • 5. Stops on the Jesuit missionaries’ journey to China

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