Cover: The Poem Is You: 60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them, from Harvard University PressCover: The Poem Is You in HARDCOVER

The Poem Is You

60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them

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HARDCOVER

$32.50 • £26.95 • €29.50

ISBN 9780674737877

Publication Date: 09/12/2016

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432 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

Belknap Press

World

  • Introduction
  • John Ashbery, Paradoxes and Oxymorons (1981)
  • Tato Laviera, tito madera smith (1981)
  • Richard Wilbur, The Ride (1982)
  • Lucille Clifton, my dream about the second coming (1982 / 1987)
  • Carla Harryman, Possession (1982)
  • John Hollander, Songs & Sonnets (1983)
  • Carl Dennis, More Music (1984 / 1985)
  • Liam Rector, Saxophone (1984)
  • Czesław Miłosz, trans. Robert Pinsky and Czesław Miłosz, Incantation (1984)
  • Robert Grenier, Shoe from the Waves (1984)
  • Rita Dove, Lightnin’ Blues (1986)
  • A. R. Ammons, Target (1987)
  • Yusef Komunyakaa, Facing It (1987 / 1988)
  • Diane Glancy, Hamatawk (1988 / 1991)
  • Lucie Brock-Broido, Domestic Mysticism (1988)
  • Killarney Clary, Above the Inland Empire today (1989)
  • John Yau, Modern Love (1989)
  • Robert Creeley, Oh (1990)
  • Charles Wright, December Journal (1990)
  • Allen Grossman, The Piano Player Explains Himself (1991)
  • Adrienne Rich, An Atlas of the Difficult World XIII (Dedications) (1991)
  • Louise Glück, Lamium (1992)
  • James Merrill, Self-Portrait in TyvekTM Windbreaker (1992 / 1995)
  • Linda Gregerson, Salt (1993 / 1996)
  • Kay Ryan, Emptiness (1993)
  • Albert Goldbarth, “A Wooden Eye. An 1884 Silver Dollar. A Homemade Explosive. A Set of False Teeth. And a 14-Karat Gold Ashtray” (1995 / 1998)
  • Harryette Mullen, honey jars of hair (1995)
  • Stanley Kunitz, Halley’s Comet (1995)
  • Michael Palmer, Letters to Zanzotto: Letter 3 (1995)
  • Robert Hass, Our Lady of the Snows (1996)
  • C. D. Wright, Key Episodes from an Earthly Life (1996)
  • Juan Felipe Herrera, Blood on the Wheel (1999)
  • Carter Revard, A Song That We Still Sing (2001)
  • Allan Peterson, Epigraph (2001)
  • Rae Armantrout, Our Nature (2001)
  • Elizabeth Alexander, Race (2001)
  • Liz Waldner, A / ppeal A / pple A / dam A / dream (2002)
  • kari edwards, >> > >> > >> PLEASE FORWARD & > >> (2003)
  • Agha Shahid Ali, Tonight (1996 / 2003)
  • D. A. Powell, [when he comes he is neither sun nor shade: a china doll] (2004)
  • Angie Estes, Sans Serif (2005)
  • W. S. Merwin, To the Wires Overhead (2005 / 2007)
  • Bernadette Mayer, On Sleep (2005)
  • Donald Revell, Moab (2005 / 2007)
  • Terrance Hayes, The Blue Terrance (2006)
  • Jorie Graham, Futures (2007 / 2008)
  • Laura Kasischke, Miss Weariness (2007)
  • Frank Bidart, Song of the Mortar and Pestle (2008)
  • Robyn Schiff, Lustron: The House America Has Been Waiting For (2008)
  • Mary Jo Bang, Q Is for the Quick (2009)
  • Lucia Perillo, Viagra (2009)
  • Melissa Range, The Workhorse (2010)
  • Joseph Massey, Prescription (2011)
  • dg nanouk okpik, Date: Post Glacial (2012)
  • Rosa Alcalá, Class (2012)
  • Gabby Bess, Oversized T-Shirts (2012 / 2013)
  • Brenda Shaughnessy, Hide-and-Seek with God (2012)
  • Claudia Rankine, You and your partner go to see the film (2014)
  • Brandon Som, Oulipo (2014)
  • Ross Gay, Weeping (2015)
  • Sources
  • Further Reading
  • Acknowledgements
  • Credits
  • Index

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