Cover: Jottings under Lamplight, from Harvard University PressCover: Jottings under Lamplight in HARDCOVER

Jottings under Lamplight

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HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674744257

Publication Date: 09/18/2017

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344 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

7 halftones

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  • Editors’ Introduction: Lu Xun, the In-Between Critic
  • Part 1: Self-Reflections
    • I. Prefaces and Autobiographical Essays
      • Preface to Outcry (1923)
      • Preface to Inauspicious Star (1926)
      • Preface to Graves (1926)
      • Afterword to Graves (1926)
      • How “The True Story of Ah Q” Came About (1926)
      • In Reply to Mr. Youheng (1927)
      • Preface to Self-Selected Works (1933)
      • Preface to the English Edition of Selected Short Stories of Lu Xun (1933)
      • How I Came to Write Fiction (1933)
      • More Random Thoughts after Illness (excerpt) (1935)
      • Death (1936)
      • Preface to Essays from the Semi-Concessions (1937)
    • II. In Memoriam
      • Warriors and Flies (1925)
      • Roses without Blooms, Part II (excerpt) (1926)
      • In Memory of Liu Hezhen (1926)
      • Remembrance for the Sake of Forgetting (1933)
      • In Memory of Wei Suyuan (1934)
      • On “Gossip Is a Fearful Thing” (1935)
      • A Few Matters regarding Mr. Zhang Taiyan (1937)
      • A Few Matters Recalled in Connection with Mr. Zhang Taiyan (1937)
  • Part 2: Reflections on Culture
    • III. On Tradition
      • My Views on Chastity (1918)
      • Impromptu Reflections No. 38: On Arrogance and Inheritance (1918)
      • On Conducting Ourselves as Fathers Today (1919)
      • Before the Appearance of Geniuses (1924)
      • Jottings under Lamplight (1925)
      • On Looking at Things with Eyes Wide Open (1925)
      • Why “Fair Play” Should Be Deferred (1926)
      • Voiceless China (1927)
      • The Old Tunes Are Finished (1927)
      • Tablet (1928)
      • The Evolution of Men (1933)
      • Thinking of the Past Again (1933)
      • Curiosities (1934)
      • Confucius in Modern China (1935)
    • IV. On Art and Literature
      • Impromptu Reflections No. 43 (1919)
      • My Hopes for the Critics (1922)
      • Must-Read Books for Young People (1925)
      • This Is What I Meant (1925)
      • Old Books and the Vernacular (1926)
      • Literature in Times of Revolution (1927)
      • Miscellaneous Thoughts (1927)
      • The Divergence of Art and Politics (1928)
      • Literature and Revolution: A Reply (1928)
      • An Overview of the Present State of New Literature (1929)
      • A Glimpse at Shanghai Literature (1931)
      • On the “Third Type of Person” (1932)
      • The Most Artistic Country (1933)
      • The Crisis of the Small Essay (1933)
    • V. On Modern Culture
      • Impromptu Reflections No. 48 (1919)
      • Untitled (1922)
      • What Happens after Nora Walks Out (1924)
      • On Photography and Related Matters (1925)
      • Modern History (1933)
      • Lessons from the Movies (1933)
      • Shanghai Children (1933)
      • How to Train Wild Animals (1933)
      • Toys (1934)
      • The Glory to Come (1934)
      • The Decline of the Western Suit (1934)
      • Take-ism (1934)
      • Ah Jin (1936)
      • Written Deep into the Night (1936)
  • Notes
  • Lu Xun’s Oeuvre
  • Acknowledgments
  • Illustration Credits
  • Index

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