HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Rituals of Self-Revelation in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 164

Rituals of Self-Revelation

Shishōsetsu as Literary Genre and Socio-Cultural Phenomenon

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$45.95 • £36.95 • €41.50

ISBN 9780674773196

Publication Date: 04/15/1996

Short

  • Preface
  • Abbreviations Used in the Notes and Bibliography
  • Preliminary Remarks on Procedures
  • Introduction
  • I. Context and Origins
    • 1. Historical and Cultural Context
    • 2. Shizenshugi—Japanese Naturalism
    • 3. Tayama Katai—A Japanese Naturalist
      • The Question of “Influence”
      • West–East Elective Affinities
      • “Misunderstandings”
      • Innovation as Renovation
    • 4. “Futon”
      • Autobiographical Elements
      • The Influence of Hauptmann
      • The Genealogy of the Work
      • “Reinforcements” in Contemporary Literature
    • 5. The “Theoretical” Reception of “Futon”—Reviews and Essays
    • 6. The “Practical” Reception of “Futon”—Imitations and Parodies
  • II. Shishōsetsu Research
    • 7. General Observations on the State of Research
    • 8. The “Classics” of Shishōsetsu Research
      • Kobayashi Hideo: “Watakushishōsetsuron”
      • Itō Sei: Shōsetsu no hōhō
      • Nakamura Mitsuo: Fūzoku shōsetsuron
      • Hirano Ken: Geijutsu to jisseikatsu
    • 9. A Survey of Shishōsetsu Research
      • History of Shishōsetsu and of Shishōsetsu Theory
      • Shishōsetsu Authors and Works
      • Special Aspects of Shishōsetsu
      • Recent Trends in Shishōsetsu Research, 1979–1988
  • III. Genre Theory
    • 10. History of the Term
      • Predecessors of Shishōsetsu
      • Theoretical Premises
      • The Origins of the Term Watakushishōsetsu
    • 11. The Literary Debate Surrounding Shishōsetsu
      • The Context of the Discussion
      • The Dispute over Shishōsetsu
    • 12. Conventional Definitions of Shishōsetsu
    • 13. Genre Theory in Japan
    • 14. Shishōsetsu—An Attempt to Define the Genre
      • Preliminary Thoughts
      • Outline of a Structural Model
  • IV. Transformations in Shishōsetsu
    • 15. Literary Evolution—An Outline
    • 16. Shishōsetsu—Examples and Analysis
      • Iwano Hōmei: “Tandeki” (1909)
      • Chikamatsu Shūkō: “Giwaku” (1913)
      • Shiga Naoya: “Wakai” (1917)
      • Kasai Zenzō: “Ko o tsurete” (1918)
      • Kikuchi Kan: “Tomo to tomo to no aida” (1918)
      • Hayashi Fumiko: Hōrōki (1928–1930)
      • Dazai Osamu: Ningen shikkaku (1948)
      • Miura Tetsuo: “Shinobugawa” (1960)
  • V. Shishōsetsu within the System of Literary Communication
    • 17. Introductory Remarks
    • 18. Shishōsetsu’s Communicative Function
      • The Author of Shishōsetsu
      • The Hero in Shishōsetsu
      • The Shishōsetsu Reader
    • 19. Aspects of Traditionalism
      • Diaries and Miscellany Literature
      • “Lyricism”
      • Nature Mysticism
    • 20. The Cultural Code
      • The Makoto Principle
      • Empiricism
      • The Myth of Immediacy
      • Irrationalism and Fatalism
    • 21. Shishōsetsu—A Critical Assessment
  • Bibliography
  • Appendix to the Bibliography
  • Index of Persons and Works
  • Subject Index

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