CARL NEWELL JACKSON LECTURES
Cover: The Roman Near East: 31 BC–AD 337, from Harvard University PressCover: The Roman Near East in PAPERBACK

The Roman Near East

31 BC–AD 337

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PAPERBACK

$50.00 • £40.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780674778863

Publication Date: 03/15/1995

Academic Trade

624 pages

6-3/8 x 9-1/4 inches

12 maps

Carl Newell Jackson Lectures

World

Related Subjects

  • Preface
  • Abbreviations
    • 1. Prologue: In Search of the Orient
  • I. Empire
    • 2. The Bridgehead and the Dependent Kingdoms, 31 BC–AD 74
      • 2.1. From the Battle of Actium to the Death of Herod the Great
      • 2.2. From the Death of Herod the Great to the End of Tiberius’ Reign
      • 2.3. From the Reign of Gaius to the Outbreak of the Jewish War
      • 2.4. The Jewish War and Its Aftermath
    • 3. Imperialism and Expansion, AD 74–195
      • 3.1. Vespasian: A New Near Eastern Empire
      • 3.2. Trajan: Expansion and Rearrangement in the Southern Near East
      • 3.3. The Roman Presence, AD 114–161
      • 3.4. Emperors and Pretenders in the Near East from Lucius Verus to Septimius Severus: The Conquest of Mesopotamia
    • 4. Rome and Mesopotamia: From Parthia to Persia
      • 4.1. The Severan Near East as a Military Structure
      • 4.2. Emperors on Campaign, from Caracalla to Philip the Arab
      • 4.3. Shapur’s Invasions and the Empire of Palmyra, AD 252–273
    • 5. The Tetrarchy and Constantine
      • 5.1. The Tetrarchy: Persian Wars and Fortified Lines
      • 5.2. The Near East in the Tetrarchic Empire, AD 284–312
      • 5.3. Licinius and Constantine, AD 313–337: Retrospect from a Christianised Empire
  • II. Regions and Communities
    • 6. Communal and Cultural Identities
    • 7. The Tetrapolis and Northern Syria
      • 7.1. The Geographical Context
      • 7.2. Local Cult-Centres: Hierapolis and Doliche
      • 7.3. Villages and Rural Temples
      • 7.4. The Major Cities: Apamea
    • 8. The Phoenician Coast and Its Hinterland
      • 8.1. History and Geography
      • 8.2. Phoenicia: The Southern Region
      • 8.3. The Northern Coastline and Its Hinterland
      • 8.4. The Major Cities: Byblos and Berytus
      • 8.5. Sidon and Tyre
    • 9. Eastern Syria Phoenice: Mountain, Oasis and Steppe
      • 9.1. Geographical Connections
      • 9.2. Emesa and Elagabal
      • 9.3. Damascus and Its Region
      • 9.4. Palmyra
    • 10. From Judaea to Syria Palaestina
      • 10.1. History, Religion and Geography
      • 10.2. Judaea before the First Revolt
      • 10.3. From the First Jewish Revolt to the Second
      • 10.4. Syria Palaestina
    • 11. Arabia
      • 11.1. Regions and Cultures
      • 11.2. The Kingdom of Nabataea
      • 11.3. The Decapolis in the First Century
      • 11.4. The New Province of Arabia
      • 11.5. The Nomadic Presence
    • 12. The Euphrates and Mesopotamia
      • 12.1. Geography, Culture and Language
      • 12.2. Dura-Europos in the Parthian Period
      • 12.3. The Middle Euphrates and the Coming of Rome
      • 12.4. Roman Dura-Europos
      • 12.5. Edessa as a Kingdom and Roman Colony until the Middle of the Third Century
      • 12.6. Social and Religious Currents in the Fourth Century
    • 13. Epilogue: East and West
      • 13.1. East?
      • 13.2. West?
  • Appendix A. The Inscriptions of the Tetrarchic Land-Surveyors
  • Appendix B. Documents from the Bar Kochba War
  • Appendix C. Materials for the History of Roman Edessa and Osrhoene, AD 163–337
  • Maps
    • I. The Near East: Areas Covered by Maps II–XII
    • II. The Roman Near East: Main Sites and Geographical Features
    • III. Northwestern Syria and Mount Amanus
    • IV. The Phoenician Coast and Western Syria Phoenice
    • V. The Central Syrian Steppe, Palmyra and the Euphrates
    • VI. Judaea/Syria Palaestina, Western Arabia
    • VII. Southeastern Syria Phoenice, Northern Arabia
    • VIII. Petra and South-Central Arabia
    • IX. Arabia, with Sinai, the Red Sea and the Hedjaz
    • X. Eastern Syria, the Euphrates and Western Mesopotamia
    • XI. Central Mesopotamia and Mons Masius
    • XII. The Eastern Syrian Steppe and the Middle Euphrates
  • General Index
  • Index of Literary Sources
  • Index of Documents

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